Phytate, calcium, iron, and zinc contents and their molar ratios in foods commonly consumed in China

Guansheng Ma, Ying Jin, Jianhua Piao, F.J. Kok, A.B. Bonnema, E. Jacobsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

135 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A total of 60 food samples commonly consumed in China were analyzed for phytate using the anion-exchange method and for calcium, iron, and zinc using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The foods analyzed included those based on cereal grains and soybean. Phytate contents expressed on a wet weight basis ranged from 0 for foods made from starches to 1878 mg/100 g for dried stick-shaped soybean milk film. The calcium contents were between 2.08 mg/100 g for ground corn and 760.67 mg/100 g for diced fried soybean curd. The lowest values of iron and zinc were 0.04 mg/100 g for Panjin pearl rice cooked with discarding extra water and 0.08 mg/100 g for potato and bean starches, while the highest values of iron and zinc were observed in dried stick-shaped soybean milk film. Although many foods were relatively rich in calcium, zinc, and iron, many also contained a higher level of phytate. Of the 60 food samples, 34 foods had a phytate/calcium molar ratio >0.24, 53 foods had a phytate/iron molar ratio >1, 31 foods had a phytate/zinc molar ratio >15, and only 7 foods had a phytate × calcium/zinc >200. Phytate in foods impair the bioavailability of calcium, iron, and zinc, which to some extent depends upon food processing and cooking methods.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10285-10290
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume53
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Keywords

  • performance liquid-chromatography
  • phytic acid
  • ascorbic-acid
  • bioavailability
  • absorption
  • rats
  • cooking
  • cereal
  • bread
  • bran

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