Personal exposure to airborne particles : validity of outdoor concentrations of exposure in time series studies

N. Janssen

    Research output: Thesisinternal PhD, WU

    Abstract

    <p>This thesis describes a study of the relation between outdoor concentrations and personal exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution. The main objective of the study was to examine the validity of outdoor concentrations as a measure of exposure to PM in times series studies. Repeated measurements of personal and outdoor concentrations of particles smaller than 10μm (PM10) were conducted in 37 non-smoking adults and 45 children. In addition, repeated measurements of fine particles (FP; particles&lt;3μm) were conducted in 13 children. For each subject separately, personal exposures were related to outdoor concentrations using linear regression analysis. The distributions of the individual correlation coefficients were investigated. Furthermore, the extent to which differences between personal and outdoor concentrations could be explained was studied.</p><p>Personal PM10 concentrations of both adults and children were reasonably well correlated over time with ambient PM10 concentrations. Personal FP exposures were highly correlated with ambient FP concentrations. Excluding days with exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) improved the correlations. In all cases, the medians of the individual correlation coefficients were higher than the estimated cross-sectional correlations.</p><p>Personal exposures exceeded outdoor concentrations. An important part of these differences could be attributed to exposure to ETS. For non-ETS exposed subjects, differences between personal and outdoor concentrations were relatively small for PM10 in adults and for FP in children. Personal PM10 concentrations among non-ETS exposed children, however, were still more than two times higher than ambient PM10 concentrations. An important part of this remaining difference could be attributed to high PM10 concentrations in the classrooms. Results of the analysis of the elemental composition of part of the classroom PM10 samples suggest that these high classroom concentrations were due to resuspension of coarse particles and/or suspension of soil material.</p><p>The findings of this study provide support for the use of fixed site measurements as a measure of exposure to PM in epidemiological time series studies linking the day-to-day variation in PM to the day-to-day variation in health endpoints.</p>
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Awarding Institution
    Supervisors/Advisors
    • Brunekreef, B., Promotor, External person
    • Jantunen, M.J., Co-promotor, External person
    • Hoek, G., Co-promotor
    Award date18 Sep 1998
    Place of PublicationS.l.
    Publisher
    Print ISBNs9789054859185
    Publication statusPublished - 1998

    Fingerprint

    time series
    particulate matter
    exposure
    particle
    resuspension
    regression analysis
    atmospheric pollution
    tobacco smoke
    soil

    Keywords

    • public health
    • airborne infection
    • particles
    • dust

    Cite this

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    title = "Personal exposure to airborne particles : validity of outdoor concentrations of exposure in time series studies",
    abstract = "This thesis describes a study of the relation between outdoor concentrations and personal exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution. The main objective of the study was to examine the validity of outdoor concentrations as a measure of exposure to PM in times series studies. Repeated measurements of personal and outdoor concentrations of particles smaller than 10μm (PM10) were conducted in 37 non-smoking adults and 45 children. In addition, repeated measurements of fine particles (FP; particles<3μm) were conducted in 13 children. For each subject separately, personal exposures were related to outdoor concentrations using linear regression analysis. The distributions of the individual correlation coefficients were investigated. Furthermore, the extent to which differences between personal and outdoor concentrations could be explained was studied.Personal PM10 concentrations of both adults and children were reasonably well correlated over time with ambient PM10 concentrations. Personal FP exposures were highly correlated with ambient FP concentrations. Excluding days with exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) improved the correlations. In all cases, the medians of the individual correlation coefficients were higher than the estimated cross-sectional correlations.Personal exposures exceeded outdoor concentrations. An important part of these differences could be attributed to exposure to ETS. For non-ETS exposed subjects, differences between personal and outdoor concentrations were relatively small for PM10 in adults and for FP in children. Personal PM10 concentrations among non-ETS exposed children, however, were still more than two times higher than ambient PM10 concentrations. An important part of this remaining difference could be attributed to high PM10 concentrations in the classrooms. Results of the analysis of the elemental composition of part of the classroom PM10 samples suggest that these high classroom concentrations were due to resuspension of coarse particles and/or suspension of soil material.The findings of this study provide support for the use of fixed site measurements as a measure of exposure to PM in epidemiological time series studies linking the day-to-day variation in PM to the day-to-day variation in health endpoints.",
    keywords = "volksgezondheid, infectie door luchtdeeltjes, deeltjes, stof, public health, airborne infection, particles, dust",
    author = "N. Janssen",
    note = "WU thesis 2484 Proefschrift Wageningen",
    year = "1998",
    language = "English",
    isbn = "9789054859185",
    publisher = "Janssen",

    }

    Personal exposure to airborne particles : validity of outdoor concentrations of exposure in time series studies. / Janssen, N.

    S.l. : Janssen, 1998. 138 p.

    Research output: Thesisinternal PhD, WU

    TY - THES

    T1 - Personal exposure to airborne particles : validity of outdoor concentrations of exposure in time series studies

    AU - Janssen, N.

    N1 - WU thesis 2484 Proefschrift Wageningen

    PY - 1998

    Y1 - 1998

    N2 - This thesis describes a study of the relation between outdoor concentrations and personal exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution. The main objective of the study was to examine the validity of outdoor concentrations as a measure of exposure to PM in times series studies. Repeated measurements of personal and outdoor concentrations of particles smaller than 10μm (PM10) were conducted in 37 non-smoking adults and 45 children. In addition, repeated measurements of fine particles (FP; particles<3μm) were conducted in 13 children. For each subject separately, personal exposures were related to outdoor concentrations using linear regression analysis. The distributions of the individual correlation coefficients were investigated. Furthermore, the extent to which differences between personal and outdoor concentrations could be explained was studied.Personal PM10 concentrations of both adults and children were reasonably well correlated over time with ambient PM10 concentrations. Personal FP exposures were highly correlated with ambient FP concentrations. Excluding days with exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) improved the correlations. In all cases, the medians of the individual correlation coefficients were higher than the estimated cross-sectional correlations.Personal exposures exceeded outdoor concentrations. An important part of these differences could be attributed to exposure to ETS. For non-ETS exposed subjects, differences between personal and outdoor concentrations were relatively small for PM10 in adults and for FP in children. Personal PM10 concentrations among non-ETS exposed children, however, were still more than two times higher than ambient PM10 concentrations. An important part of this remaining difference could be attributed to high PM10 concentrations in the classrooms. Results of the analysis of the elemental composition of part of the classroom PM10 samples suggest that these high classroom concentrations were due to resuspension of coarse particles and/or suspension of soil material.The findings of this study provide support for the use of fixed site measurements as a measure of exposure to PM in epidemiological time series studies linking the day-to-day variation in PM to the day-to-day variation in health endpoints.

    AB - This thesis describes a study of the relation between outdoor concentrations and personal exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution. The main objective of the study was to examine the validity of outdoor concentrations as a measure of exposure to PM in times series studies. Repeated measurements of personal and outdoor concentrations of particles smaller than 10μm (PM10) were conducted in 37 non-smoking adults and 45 children. In addition, repeated measurements of fine particles (FP; particles<3μm) were conducted in 13 children. For each subject separately, personal exposures were related to outdoor concentrations using linear regression analysis. The distributions of the individual correlation coefficients were investigated. Furthermore, the extent to which differences between personal and outdoor concentrations could be explained was studied.Personal PM10 concentrations of both adults and children were reasonably well correlated over time with ambient PM10 concentrations. Personal FP exposures were highly correlated with ambient FP concentrations. Excluding days with exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) improved the correlations. In all cases, the medians of the individual correlation coefficients were higher than the estimated cross-sectional correlations.Personal exposures exceeded outdoor concentrations. An important part of these differences could be attributed to exposure to ETS. For non-ETS exposed subjects, differences between personal and outdoor concentrations were relatively small for PM10 in adults and for FP in children. Personal PM10 concentrations among non-ETS exposed children, however, were still more than two times higher than ambient PM10 concentrations. An important part of this remaining difference could be attributed to high PM10 concentrations in the classrooms. Results of the analysis of the elemental composition of part of the classroom PM10 samples suggest that these high classroom concentrations were due to resuspension of coarse particles and/or suspension of soil material.The findings of this study provide support for the use of fixed site measurements as a measure of exposure to PM in epidemiological time series studies linking the day-to-day variation in PM to the day-to-day variation in health endpoints.

    KW - volksgezondheid

    KW - infectie door luchtdeeltjes

    KW - deeltjes

    KW - stof

    KW - public health

    KW - airborne infection

    KW - particles

    KW - dust

    M3 - internal PhD, WU

    SN - 9789054859185

    PB - Janssen

    CY - S.l.

    ER -