Perceived control moderates the relationship between social capital and binge drinking: longitudinal findings from the Montreal Neighborhood Networks and Health Aging (MoNNET-HA) panel

Stephanie Child, Steven Stewart, Spencer Moore*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Cross-sectional research suggests social capital has negative consequences for problem drinking behaviors. Previous studies have suggested psychosocial resources, including perceived control, may buffer this association. Little research has examined whether such relationships persist longitudinally. Methods Random effects models examined between-person relationships among problem drinking, social capital, and perceived control, and whether perceived control moderated the relationship between social capital and drinking. Fixed effects models assessed whether social capital and perceived control were related to changes in problem drinking. Results Greater network capital and generalized trust predicted higher odds of binge drinking (RR = 1.08; 95% CI = 1.03-1.12 and RR = 1.23; 95% CI = 1.03-1.48, respectively). Perceived control moderated the positive association of network capital with binge drinking (RR = 0.91; 95% CI = 0.87-0.96). Conclusions The present findings support previous notions about the complex role of social capital on health, and offer new insights on the role of perceived control on problem drinking.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)128-134
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Epidemiology
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Longitudinal
  • Problem drinking
  • Psychosocial resources
  • Social capital

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