Organic resources and earthworms affect phosphorus availability to sorghum after phosphate rock addition in semi-arid West Africa

E. Ouédraogo, L. Brussaard, A. Mando, L. Stroosnijder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A field experiment was laid out in Burkina Faso (West Africa) on an Eutric Cambisol to investigate the interaction of organic resource quality and phosphate rock on crop yield and to assess the contribution of earthworms (Millsonia inermis Michaelsen) to P availability after phosphate rock application. Organic resources of different quality were applied at a dose equivalent to 40 kg N ha¿1 with or without phosphate rock from Kodjari (Burkina Faso) at a dose equivalent to 25 kg P ha¿1, and were compared with control and single phosphate rock treatments in a factorial complete block design with four replicates. Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) variety SARIASSO 14 was grown. Sheep dung had the highest impact on earthworm casting intensity followed by maize straw. Combining organic resources with phosphate rock reduced earthworm casting activities compared to a single application of organic resources or phosphate rock. Addition of phosphate rock to maize straw reduced P availability in earthworm casts whereas combining sheep dung or compost with phosphate rock increased P availability. The contribution of earthworms to Kodjari phosphate rock solubilisation mainly occurred through their casts, as the available P content of casts was 4 times higher than that of the surrounding soil
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)458-465
JournalBiology and Fertility of Soils
Volume41
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Keywords

  • agricultural intensification
  • humid tropics
  • agroecosystem function
  • soil biodiversity
  • crusted soil
  • mulch
  • decomposition
  • termites
  • quality

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Organic resources and earthworms affect phosphorus availability to sorghum after phosphate rock addition in semi-arid West Africa'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this