Organic acid production from potato starch waste fermentation by rumen microbial communities from Dutch and Thai dairy cows

Susakul Palakawong Na Ayudthaya, Antonius H.P. Van De Weijer, Antonie H. Van Gelder, Alfons J.M. Stams, Willem M. De Vos, Caroline M. Plugge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Exploring different microbial sources for biotechnological production of organic acids is important. Dutch and Thai cow rumen samples were used as inocula to produce organic acid from starch waste in anaerobic reactors. Organic acid production profiles were determined and microbial communities were compared using 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid gene amplicon pyrosequencing. Results: In both reactors, lactate was the main initial product and was associated with growth of Streptococcus spp. (86% average relative abundance). Subsequently, lactate served as a substrate for secondary fermentations. In the reactor inoculated with rumen fluid from the Dutch cow, the relative abundance of Bacillus and Streptococcus increased from the start, and lactate, acetate, formate and ethanol were produced. From day 1.33 to 2, lactate and acetate were degraded, resulting in butyrate production. Butyrate production coincided with a decrease in relative abundance of Streptococcus spp. and increased relative abundances of bacteria of other groups, including Parabacteroides, Sporanaerobacter, Helicobacteraceae, Peptostreptococcaceae and Porphyromonadaceae. In the reactor with the Thai cow inoculum, Streptococcus spp. also increased from the start. When lactate was consumed, acetate, propionate and butyrate were produced (day 3-4). After day 3, bacteria belonging to five dominant groups, Bacteroides, Pseudoramibacter-Eubacterium, Dysgonomonas, Enterobacteriaceae and Porphyromonadaceae, were detected and these showed significant positive correlations with acetate, propionate and butyrate levels. Conclusions: The complexity of rumen microorganisms with high adaptation capacity makes rumen fluid a suitable source to convert organic waste into valuable products without the addition of hydrolytic enzymes. Starch waste is a source for organic acid production, especially lactate.
LanguageEnglish
Article number13
JournalBiotechnology for Biofuels
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

Dairies
Organic acids
Rumen
Solanum tuberosum
Starch
organic acid
potato
starch
Fermentation
fermentation
microbial community
relative abundance
Lactic Acid
acetate
Butyrates
Streptococcus
Acids
Acetates
formic acid
Propionates

Keywords

  • Lactate fermentation
  • Microbial communities
  • Organic acids
  • Renewable energy
  • Rumen fluid
  • Starch waste

Cite this

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title = "Organic acid production from potato starch waste fermentation by rumen microbial communities from Dutch and Thai dairy cows",
abstract = "Background: Exploring different microbial sources for biotechnological production of organic acids is important. Dutch and Thai cow rumen samples were used as inocula to produce organic acid from starch waste in anaerobic reactors. Organic acid production profiles were determined and microbial communities were compared using 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid gene amplicon pyrosequencing. Results: In both reactors, lactate was the main initial product and was associated with growth of Streptococcus spp. (86{\%} average relative abundance). Subsequently, lactate served as a substrate for secondary fermentations. In the reactor inoculated with rumen fluid from the Dutch cow, the relative abundance of Bacillus and Streptococcus increased from the start, and lactate, acetate, formate and ethanol were produced. From day 1.33 to 2, lactate and acetate were degraded, resulting in butyrate production. Butyrate production coincided with a decrease in relative abundance of Streptococcus spp. and increased relative abundances of bacteria of other groups, including Parabacteroides, Sporanaerobacter, Helicobacteraceae, Peptostreptococcaceae and Porphyromonadaceae. In the reactor with the Thai cow inoculum, Streptococcus spp. also increased from the start. When lactate was consumed, acetate, propionate and butyrate were produced (day 3-4). After day 3, bacteria belonging to five dominant groups, Bacteroides, Pseudoramibacter-Eubacterium, Dysgonomonas, Enterobacteriaceae and Porphyromonadaceae, were detected and these showed significant positive correlations with acetate, propionate and butyrate levels. Conclusions: The complexity of rumen microorganisms with high adaptation capacity makes rumen fluid a suitable source to convert organic waste into valuable products without the addition of hydrolytic enzymes. Starch waste is a source for organic acid production, especially lactate.",
keywords = "Lactate fermentation, Microbial communities, Organic acids, Renewable energy, Rumen fluid, Starch waste",
author = "{Palakawong Na Ayudthaya}, Susakul and {Van De Weijer}, {Antonius H.P.} and {Van Gelder}, {Antonie H.} and Stams, {Alfons J.M.} and {De Vos}, {Willem M.} and Plugge, {Caroline M.}",
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day = "25",
doi = "10.1186/s13068-018-1012-4",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
journal = "Biotechnology for Biofuels",
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Organic acid production from potato starch waste fermentation by rumen microbial communities from Dutch and Thai dairy cows. / Palakawong Na Ayudthaya, Susakul; Van De Weijer, Antonius H.P.; Van Gelder, Antonie H.; Stams, Alfons J.M.; De Vos, Willem M.; Plugge, Caroline M.

In: Biotechnology for Biofuels, Vol. 11, No. 1, 13, 25.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Organic acid production from potato starch waste fermentation by rumen microbial communities from Dutch and Thai dairy cows

AU - Palakawong Na Ayudthaya, Susakul

AU - Van De Weijer, Antonius H.P.

AU - Van Gelder, Antonie H.

AU - Stams, Alfons J.M.

AU - De Vos, Willem M.

AU - Plugge, Caroline M.

PY - 2018/1/25

Y1 - 2018/1/25

N2 - Background: Exploring different microbial sources for biotechnological production of organic acids is important. Dutch and Thai cow rumen samples were used as inocula to produce organic acid from starch waste in anaerobic reactors. Organic acid production profiles were determined and microbial communities were compared using 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid gene amplicon pyrosequencing. Results: In both reactors, lactate was the main initial product and was associated with growth of Streptococcus spp. (86% average relative abundance). Subsequently, lactate served as a substrate for secondary fermentations. In the reactor inoculated with rumen fluid from the Dutch cow, the relative abundance of Bacillus and Streptococcus increased from the start, and lactate, acetate, formate and ethanol were produced. From day 1.33 to 2, lactate and acetate were degraded, resulting in butyrate production. Butyrate production coincided with a decrease in relative abundance of Streptococcus spp. and increased relative abundances of bacteria of other groups, including Parabacteroides, Sporanaerobacter, Helicobacteraceae, Peptostreptococcaceae and Porphyromonadaceae. In the reactor with the Thai cow inoculum, Streptococcus spp. also increased from the start. When lactate was consumed, acetate, propionate and butyrate were produced (day 3-4). After day 3, bacteria belonging to five dominant groups, Bacteroides, Pseudoramibacter-Eubacterium, Dysgonomonas, Enterobacteriaceae and Porphyromonadaceae, were detected and these showed significant positive correlations with acetate, propionate and butyrate levels. Conclusions: The complexity of rumen microorganisms with high adaptation capacity makes rumen fluid a suitable source to convert organic waste into valuable products without the addition of hydrolytic enzymes. Starch waste is a source for organic acid production, especially lactate.

AB - Background: Exploring different microbial sources for biotechnological production of organic acids is important. Dutch and Thai cow rumen samples were used as inocula to produce organic acid from starch waste in anaerobic reactors. Organic acid production profiles were determined and microbial communities were compared using 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid gene amplicon pyrosequencing. Results: In both reactors, lactate was the main initial product and was associated with growth of Streptococcus spp. (86% average relative abundance). Subsequently, lactate served as a substrate for secondary fermentations. In the reactor inoculated with rumen fluid from the Dutch cow, the relative abundance of Bacillus and Streptococcus increased from the start, and lactate, acetate, formate and ethanol were produced. From day 1.33 to 2, lactate and acetate were degraded, resulting in butyrate production. Butyrate production coincided with a decrease in relative abundance of Streptococcus spp. and increased relative abundances of bacteria of other groups, including Parabacteroides, Sporanaerobacter, Helicobacteraceae, Peptostreptococcaceae and Porphyromonadaceae. In the reactor with the Thai cow inoculum, Streptococcus spp. also increased from the start. When lactate was consumed, acetate, propionate and butyrate were produced (day 3-4). After day 3, bacteria belonging to five dominant groups, Bacteroides, Pseudoramibacter-Eubacterium, Dysgonomonas, Enterobacteriaceae and Porphyromonadaceae, were detected and these showed significant positive correlations with acetate, propionate and butyrate levels. Conclusions: The complexity of rumen microorganisms with high adaptation capacity makes rumen fluid a suitable source to convert organic waste into valuable products without the addition of hydrolytic enzymes. Starch waste is a source for organic acid production, especially lactate.

KW - Lactate fermentation

KW - Microbial communities

KW - Organic acids

KW - Renewable energy

KW - Rumen fluid

KW - Starch waste

UR - https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.c.3987942

U2 - 10.1186/s13068-018-1012-4

DO - 10.1186/s13068-018-1012-4

M3 - Article

VL - 11

JO - Biotechnology for Biofuels

T2 - Biotechnology for Biofuels

JF - Biotechnology for Biofuels

SN - 1754-6834

IS - 1

M1 - 13

ER -