On-farm evaluation of integrated weed management tools for maize production in three different agro-environments in Europe: Agronomic efficacy, herbicide use reduction, and economic sustainability

V.P. Vasileiadis, S. Otto, W. van Dijk, G. Urek, R. Leskovšek, A. Verschwele, L. Furlan, M. Sattin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The development and implementation of integrated weed management (IWM) strategies that provide good weed control while reducing dependence on herbicides, and preferably without having side effects on the overall system economic performance, is still a challenge that has to be met. In 2011 and 2012, nine on-farm experiments (i.e., real field conditions on commercial farms, with natural weed flora) were conducted in three important European maize producing regions-countries, which represent the range of climatic and edaphic conditions in Europe, to evaluate the efficacy of different locally selected IWM tools for direct weed control in maize vs. the conventional approach (CON) followed by the farms. The IWM tools tested were: (1) early post-emergence herbicide band application combined with hoeing followed by a second hoeing in Southern Germany, (2) early post-emergence herbicide broadcast application when indicated by a predictive model of weed emergence after performing one scouting in the field to supply data for the model, followed by hoeing in Northern Italy, and (3) tine harrowing at 2-3rd leaf stage of maize and low dose of post-emergence herbicide in Slovenia. Results showed that the IWM tools tested in the different countries: (1) provided sufficient weed control without any significant differences in yields, (2) greatly reduced maize reliance on herbicides, and (3) IWM implementation was economically sustainable as no significant differences in gross margin were observed in any country compared to CON.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)71-78
JournalEuropean Journal of Agronomy
Volume63
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

economic sustainability
integrated weed management
weed
herbicide
hoeing
herbicides
maize
sustainability
farm
farms
corn
weed control
economics
weeds
harrowing
economic performance
commercial farms
Slovenia
pesticide application
economic system

Keywords

  • Corn
  • Economic sustainability
  • Integrated pest management
  • Pesticide risk reduction

Cite this

@article{8b37036d96e9424f9fcc8c0a6b62658d,
title = "On-farm evaluation of integrated weed management tools for maize production in three different agro-environments in Europe: Agronomic efficacy, herbicide use reduction, and economic sustainability",
abstract = "The development and implementation of integrated weed management (IWM) strategies that provide good weed control while reducing dependence on herbicides, and preferably without having side effects on the overall system economic performance, is still a challenge that has to be met. In 2011 and 2012, nine on-farm experiments (i.e., real field conditions on commercial farms, with natural weed flora) were conducted in three important European maize producing regions-countries, which represent the range of climatic and edaphic conditions in Europe, to evaluate the efficacy of different locally selected IWM tools for direct weed control in maize vs. the conventional approach (CON) followed by the farms. The IWM tools tested were: (1) early post-emergence herbicide band application combined with hoeing followed by a second hoeing in Southern Germany, (2) early post-emergence herbicide broadcast application when indicated by a predictive model of weed emergence after performing one scouting in the field to supply data for the model, followed by hoeing in Northern Italy, and (3) tine harrowing at 2-3rd leaf stage of maize and low dose of post-emergence herbicide in Slovenia. Results showed that the IWM tools tested in the different countries: (1) provided sufficient weed control without any significant differences in yields, (2) greatly reduced maize reliance on herbicides, and (3) IWM implementation was economically sustainable as no significant differences in gross margin were observed in any country compared to CON.",
keywords = "Corn, Economic sustainability, Integrated pest management, Pesticide risk reduction",
author = "V.P. Vasileiadis and S. Otto and {van Dijk}, W. and G. Urek and R. Leskovšek and A. Verschwele and L. Furlan and M. Sattin",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1016/j.eja.2014.12.001",
language = "English",
volume = "63",
pages = "71--78",
journal = "European Journal of Agronomy",
issn = "1161-0301",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

On-farm evaluation of integrated weed management tools for maize production in three different agro-environments in Europe : Agronomic efficacy, herbicide use reduction, and economic sustainability. / Vasileiadis, V.P.; Otto, S.; van Dijk, W.; Urek, G.; Leskovšek, R.; Verschwele, A.; Furlan, L.; Sattin, M.

In: European Journal of Agronomy, Vol. 63, 2015, p. 71-78.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - On-farm evaluation of integrated weed management tools for maize production in three different agro-environments in Europe

T2 - Agronomic efficacy, herbicide use reduction, and economic sustainability

AU - Vasileiadis, V.P.

AU - Otto, S.

AU - van Dijk, W.

AU - Urek, G.

AU - Leskovšek, R.

AU - Verschwele, A.

AU - Furlan, L.

AU - Sattin, M.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - The development and implementation of integrated weed management (IWM) strategies that provide good weed control while reducing dependence on herbicides, and preferably without having side effects on the overall system economic performance, is still a challenge that has to be met. In 2011 and 2012, nine on-farm experiments (i.e., real field conditions on commercial farms, with natural weed flora) were conducted in three important European maize producing regions-countries, which represent the range of climatic and edaphic conditions in Europe, to evaluate the efficacy of different locally selected IWM tools for direct weed control in maize vs. the conventional approach (CON) followed by the farms. The IWM tools tested were: (1) early post-emergence herbicide band application combined with hoeing followed by a second hoeing in Southern Germany, (2) early post-emergence herbicide broadcast application when indicated by a predictive model of weed emergence after performing one scouting in the field to supply data for the model, followed by hoeing in Northern Italy, and (3) tine harrowing at 2-3rd leaf stage of maize and low dose of post-emergence herbicide in Slovenia. Results showed that the IWM tools tested in the different countries: (1) provided sufficient weed control without any significant differences in yields, (2) greatly reduced maize reliance on herbicides, and (3) IWM implementation was economically sustainable as no significant differences in gross margin were observed in any country compared to CON.

AB - The development and implementation of integrated weed management (IWM) strategies that provide good weed control while reducing dependence on herbicides, and preferably without having side effects on the overall system economic performance, is still a challenge that has to be met. In 2011 and 2012, nine on-farm experiments (i.e., real field conditions on commercial farms, with natural weed flora) were conducted in three important European maize producing regions-countries, which represent the range of climatic and edaphic conditions in Europe, to evaluate the efficacy of different locally selected IWM tools for direct weed control in maize vs. the conventional approach (CON) followed by the farms. The IWM tools tested were: (1) early post-emergence herbicide band application combined with hoeing followed by a second hoeing in Southern Germany, (2) early post-emergence herbicide broadcast application when indicated by a predictive model of weed emergence after performing one scouting in the field to supply data for the model, followed by hoeing in Northern Italy, and (3) tine harrowing at 2-3rd leaf stage of maize and low dose of post-emergence herbicide in Slovenia. Results showed that the IWM tools tested in the different countries: (1) provided sufficient weed control without any significant differences in yields, (2) greatly reduced maize reliance on herbicides, and (3) IWM implementation was economically sustainable as no significant differences in gross margin were observed in any country compared to CON.

KW - Corn

KW - Economic sustainability

KW - Integrated pest management

KW - Pesticide risk reduction

U2 - 10.1016/j.eja.2014.12.001

DO - 10.1016/j.eja.2014.12.001

M3 - Article

VL - 63

SP - 71

EP - 78

JO - European Journal of Agronomy

JF - European Journal of Agronomy

SN - 1161-0301

ER -