Olfactory discrimination of fat content in milks is facilitated by differences in volatile compound composition rather than odor intensity

Shuo Mu*, Markus Stieger, Sanne Boesveldt

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The mechanisms underlying the ability of humans to olfactorily discriminate fat content in milks remain unknown. In this study, we found that fat contents (0.5, 1.5 and 3.5% fat) can be discriminated by olfaction in commercially available pasteurized milks (p < 0.05) but not in ultra-high temperature processed (UHT) milks. The composition of volatile compounds of pasteurized milks differed with fat content, whereas that of UHT milks differing in fat content was similar. Principal component analysis revealed that differences in volatile compound composition of pasteurized milks differing in fat content contribute to olfactory discrimination. In UHT milks, acetoin and 2-heptanone may mask odor differences leading to indistinguishable odors. No differences were observed regarding perceived odor intensity of pasteurized milks or UHT milks differing in fat content. We conclude that the olfactory discrimination of fat content in pasteurized milks is facilitated by differences in volatile compound composition rather than odor intensity.

Original languageEnglish
Article number133357
JournalFood Chemistry
Volume393
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2022

Keywords

  • Discrimination test
  • Fat content
  • Gas chromatography – mass spectrometry
  • Milk
  • Odor
  • Olfactory fat perception

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