Occurrence of oligosaccharides in feces of breast-fed babies in their first six months of life and the corresponding breast milk

S.A. Albrecht, H.A. Schols, E.G.H.M. van den Heuvel, A.G.J. Voragen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

91 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The characterization of oligosaccharides in the feces of breast-fed babies is a valuable tool for monitoring the gastrointestinal fate of human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs). In the present study we monitored fecal oligosaccharide profiles together with the HMO-profiles of the respective breast milks up to six months postpartum, by means of capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence detection and mass spectrometry. Eleven mother/child pairs were included. Mother’s secretor- and Lewis-type included all combinations [Le(a-b+), Le(a+b-), Le(a-b-)]. The fecal HMO-profiles in the first few months of life are either predominantly composed of neutral or acidic HMOs and are possibly effected by the HMO-fingerprint in the respective breast milk. Independent of the initial presence of acidic or neutral fecal HMOs, a gradual change to blood-group specific oligosaccharides was observed. Their presence pointed to a gastrointestinal degradation of the feeding-related HMOs, followed by conjugation with blood group specific antigenic determinants present in the gastrointestinal mucus layer. Eleven of these ‘hybrid’-oligosaccharides were annotated in this study. When solid food was introduced, no HMOs and their degradation- and metabolization products were recovered in the fecal samples.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2540-2550
JournalCarbohydrate Research : an international journal
Volume346
Issue number16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Keywords

  • formula-fed infants
  • capillary-electrophoresis
  • mass-spectrometry
  • preterm infants
  • ce-lif
  • lewis
  • chromatography
  • lactation
  • urine

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