Occurrence of Chloramphenicol in Crops through Natural Production by Bacteria in Soil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Due to the unexpected findings of the banned antibiotic chloramphenicol in products of animal origin, feed, and straw, the hypothesis was studied that the drug is naturally present in soil, through production by soil bacteria, and subsequently can be transferred to crops. First, the stability of chloramphenicol in soil was studied. The fate of chloramphenicol highly depends on soil type and showed a half-life of approximately one day in nonsterile topsoil. It was found to be more stable in subsoil and sterile soils. Second, the production of chloramphenicol in soil was studied, and it was confirmed that Streptomyces venezuelae can produce chloramphenicol at appreciable amounts in nonsterile soil. Third, a transfer study was carried out using wheat and maize grown on three different soils that were weekly exposed to aqueous chloramphenicol solutions at different levels. Chloramphenicol was taken up by crops as determined by chiral liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometric analysis, and the...
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4004-4010
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume61
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

soil bacteria
Chloramphenicol
chloramphenicol
Crops
Bacteria
Soil
Soils
crops
soil
Streptomyces venezuelae
animal products
subsoil
Liquid chromatography
Straw
Streptomyces
topsoil
liquid chromatography
half life
soil types
straw

Keywords

  • streptomyces-venezuelae
  • vegetables
  • plants
  • manure

Cite this

@article{f07514b2f7bc4f94acf533e95ba7a914,
title = "Occurrence of Chloramphenicol in Crops through Natural Production by Bacteria in Soil",
abstract = "Due to the unexpected findings of the banned antibiotic chloramphenicol in products of animal origin, feed, and straw, the hypothesis was studied that the drug is naturally present in soil, through production by soil bacteria, and subsequently can be transferred to crops. First, the stability of chloramphenicol in soil was studied. The fate of chloramphenicol highly depends on soil type and showed a half-life of approximately one day in nonsterile topsoil. It was found to be more stable in subsoil and sterile soils. Second, the production of chloramphenicol in soil was studied, and it was confirmed that Streptomyces venezuelae can produce chloramphenicol at appreciable amounts in nonsterile soil. Third, a transfer study was carried out using wheat and maize grown on three different soils that were weekly exposed to aqueous chloramphenicol solutions at different levels. Chloramphenicol was taken up by crops as determined by chiral liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometric analysis, and the...",
keywords = "streptomyces-venezuelae, vegetables, plants, manure",
author = "B.J.A. Berendsen and M.G. Pikkemaat and P.F.A.M. Romkens and R. Wegh and {van Sisseren}, M. and A.A.M. Stolker and M.W.F. Nielen",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1021/jf400570c",
language = "English",
volume = "61",
pages = "4004--4010",
journal = "Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry",
issn = "0021-8561",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",

}

Occurrence of Chloramphenicol in Crops through Natural Production by Bacteria in Soil. / Berendsen, B.J.A.; Pikkemaat, M.G.; Romkens, P.F.A.M.; Wegh, R.; van Sisseren, M.; Stolker, A.A.M.; Nielen, M.W.F.

In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Vol. 61, 2013, p. 4004-4010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Occurrence of Chloramphenicol in Crops through Natural Production by Bacteria in Soil

AU - Berendsen, B.J.A.

AU - Pikkemaat, M.G.

AU - Romkens, P.F.A.M.

AU - Wegh, R.

AU - van Sisseren, M.

AU - Stolker, A.A.M.

AU - Nielen, M.W.F.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Due to the unexpected findings of the banned antibiotic chloramphenicol in products of animal origin, feed, and straw, the hypothesis was studied that the drug is naturally present in soil, through production by soil bacteria, and subsequently can be transferred to crops. First, the stability of chloramphenicol in soil was studied. The fate of chloramphenicol highly depends on soil type and showed a half-life of approximately one day in nonsterile topsoil. It was found to be more stable in subsoil and sterile soils. Second, the production of chloramphenicol in soil was studied, and it was confirmed that Streptomyces venezuelae can produce chloramphenicol at appreciable amounts in nonsterile soil. Third, a transfer study was carried out using wheat and maize grown on three different soils that were weekly exposed to aqueous chloramphenicol solutions at different levels. Chloramphenicol was taken up by crops as determined by chiral liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometric analysis, and the...

AB - Due to the unexpected findings of the banned antibiotic chloramphenicol in products of animal origin, feed, and straw, the hypothesis was studied that the drug is naturally present in soil, through production by soil bacteria, and subsequently can be transferred to crops. First, the stability of chloramphenicol in soil was studied. The fate of chloramphenicol highly depends on soil type and showed a half-life of approximately one day in nonsterile topsoil. It was found to be more stable in subsoil and sterile soils. Second, the production of chloramphenicol in soil was studied, and it was confirmed that Streptomyces venezuelae can produce chloramphenicol at appreciable amounts in nonsterile soil. Third, a transfer study was carried out using wheat and maize grown on three different soils that were weekly exposed to aqueous chloramphenicol solutions at different levels. Chloramphenicol was taken up by crops as determined by chiral liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometric analysis, and the...

KW - streptomyces-venezuelae

KW - vegetables

KW - plants

KW - manure

U2 - 10.1021/jf400570c

DO - 10.1021/jf400570c

M3 - Article

VL - 61

SP - 4004

EP - 4010

JO - Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

JF - Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

SN - 0021-8561

ER -