Novel foods and food allergies : an exploratory study of novel foods as allergy management strategy

M.C. van Putten

Research output: Thesisinternal PhD, WU

Abstract

Food allergy represents an increasing concern to society. It is defined as an inappropriate immunological reaction to normally harmless food components and affects 5-8% of children and 1-2% of adults. Since at the time of writing no cure for food allergy exists, food allergic consumers need to avoid all problematic foods and ingredients, which may have a negative impact on the quality of life and economic functioning of food allergic consumers and their families. Food allergies may also result in substantial costs for society overall in terms of health care costs and absenteeism.
Novel foods are continuously being developed and introduced onto the European market. The novelty of a food can be the result of: (1) genetic modification (GM) of the food itself, or its production using genetically modified organisms, (2) the application of novel processing techniques, or (3) the food in question having no prior history of consumption in general, or in a specific region or country. One potential benefit of novel foods is that of hypoallergenicity, although there is the potential risk that new proteins are introduced into the human food chain together with the novel foods.
The aim of the research presented in this thesis is to investigate whether novel foods can be used as part of an allergy management strategy. The issues associated with novel foods and food allergy are identified and insight is gained in stakeholder and consumer attitudes towards the application of novel foods as allergy management strategy. In addition, the existing novel food legislation regarding novel foods is reviewed with respect to risks (and benefits) of novel foods associated with food allergy.
The results show that that although hypoallergenic novel foods can have some positive contribution to food allergy management, their influence remains limited because many other factors other than the available foods cause the food allergy problems.
Overall, this research contributes to a better understanding of the impact of food allergy on daily lives of food allergic consumers and shows that although hypoallergenic novel foods can facilitate allergen avoidance, their influence remains limited because many other factors, such as the recognition of their allergy by their social environment cause the food allergy problems. Nevertheless, considering that the food allergy management options are limited, the contribution that hypoallergenic novel foods, which can be replacement for allergenic foods may be valuable for consumers who are allergic to foods that are easy to recognise and avoid.

Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • Wageningen University
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Frewer, Lynn, Promotor
  • Gremmen, Bart, Promotor
  • Wichers, Harry, Co-promotor
  • Gilissen, Luud, Co-promotor
Award date15 Sep 2009
Place of PublicationWageningen
Publisher
Print ISBNs9789085854494
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Food Hypersensitivity
Food
Hypersensitivity
Food Legislation
Genetically Modified Organisms
Absenteeism

Keywords

  • food allergies
  • novel foods
  • consumer attitudes
  • food intolerance
  • acceptability
  • consumers
  • management
  • control
  • quality of life

Cite this

van Putten, M.C.. / Novel foods and food allergies : an exploratory study of novel foods as allergy management strategy. Wageningen : Wageningen University, 2009. 125 p.
@phdthesis{c1fe0bc0a52b4c4ca3d359111b25becc,
title = "Novel foods and food allergies : an exploratory study of novel foods as allergy management strategy",
abstract = "Food allergy represents an increasing concern to society. It is defined as an inappropriate immunological reaction to normally harmless food components and affects 5-8{\%} of children and 1-2{\%} of adults. Since at the time of writing no cure for food allergy exists, food allergic consumers need to avoid all problematic foods and ingredients, which may have a negative impact on the quality of life and economic functioning of food allergic consumers and their families. Food allergies may also result in substantial costs for society overall in terms of health care costs and absenteeism. Novel foods are continuously being developed and introduced onto the European market. The novelty of a food can be the result of: (1) genetic modification (GM) of the food itself, or its production using genetically modified organisms, (2) the application of novel processing techniques, or (3) the food in question having no prior history of consumption in general, or in a specific region or country. One potential benefit of novel foods is that of hypoallergenicity, although there is the potential risk that new proteins are introduced into the human food chain together with the novel foods. The aim of the research presented in this thesis is to investigate whether novel foods can be used as part of an allergy management strategy. The issues associated with novel foods and food allergy are identified and insight is gained in stakeholder and consumer attitudes towards the application of novel foods as allergy management strategy. In addition, the existing novel food legislation regarding novel foods is reviewed with respect to risks (and benefits) of novel foods associated with food allergy. The results show that that although hypoallergenic novel foods can have some positive contribution to food allergy management, their influence remains limited because many other factors other than the available foods cause the food allergy problems. Overall, this research contributes to a better understanding of the impact of food allergy on daily lives of food allergic consumers and shows that although hypoallergenic novel foods can facilitate allergen avoidance, their influence remains limited because many other factors, such as the recognition of their allergy by their social environment cause the food allergy problems. Nevertheless, considering that the food allergy management options are limited, the contribution that hypoallergenic novel foods, which can be replacement for allergenic foods may be valuable for consumers who are allergic to foods that are easy to recognise and avoid.",
keywords = "voedselallergie{\"e}n, nieuwe voedingsmiddelen, houding van consumenten, voedselintolerantie, aanvaardbaarheid, consumenten, bedrijfsvoering, controle, kwaliteit van het leven, food allergies, novel foods, consumer attitudes, food intolerance, acceptability, consumers, management, control, quality of life",
author = "{van Putten}, M.C.",
note = "WU-thesis no. 4671",
year = "2009",
language = "English",
isbn = "9789085854494",
publisher = "Wageningen University",
school = "Wageningen University",

}

van Putten, MC 2009, 'Novel foods and food allergies : an exploratory study of novel foods as allergy management strategy', Doctor of Philosophy, Wageningen University, Wageningen.

Novel foods and food allergies : an exploratory study of novel foods as allergy management strategy. / van Putten, M.C.

Wageningen : Wageningen University, 2009. 125 p.

Research output: Thesisinternal PhD, WU

TY - THES

T1 - Novel foods and food allergies : an exploratory study of novel foods as allergy management strategy

AU - van Putten, M.C.

N1 - WU-thesis no. 4671

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - Food allergy represents an increasing concern to society. It is defined as an inappropriate immunological reaction to normally harmless food components and affects 5-8% of children and 1-2% of adults. Since at the time of writing no cure for food allergy exists, food allergic consumers need to avoid all problematic foods and ingredients, which may have a negative impact on the quality of life and economic functioning of food allergic consumers and their families. Food allergies may also result in substantial costs for society overall in terms of health care costs and absenteeism. Novel foods are continuously being developed and introduced onto the European market. The novelty of a food can be the result of: (1) genetic modification (GM) of the food itself, or its production using genetically modified organisms, (2) the application of novel processing techniques, or (3) the food in question having no prior history of consumption in general, or in a specific region or country. One potential benefit of novel foods is that of hypoallergenicity, although there is the potential risk that new proteins are introduced into the human food chain together with the novel foods. The aim of the research presented in this thesis is to investigate whether novel foods can be used as part of an allergy management strategy. The issues associated with novel foods and food allergy are identified and insight is gained in stakeholder and consumer attitudes towards the application of novel foods as allergy management strategy. In addition, the existing novel food legislation regarding novel foods is reviewed with respect to risks (and benefits) of novel foods associated with food allergy. The results show that that although hypoallergenic novel foods can have some positive contribution to food allergy management, their influence remains limited because many other factors other than the available foods cause the food allergy problems. Overall, this research contributes to a better understanding of the impact of food allergy on daily lives of food allergic consumers and shows that although hypoallergenic novel foods can facilitate allergen avoidance, their influence remains limited because many other factors, such as the recognition of their allergy by their social environment cause the food allergy problems. Nevertheless, considering that the food allergy management options are limited, the contribution that hypoallergenic novel foods, which can be replacement for allergenic foods may be valuable for consumers who are allergic to foods that are easy to recognise and avoid.

AB - Food allergy represents an increasing concern to society. It is defined as an inappropriate immunological reaction to normally harmless food components and affects 5-8% of children and 1-2% of adults. Since at the time of writing no cure for food allergy exists, food allergic consumers need to avoid all problematic foods and ingredients, which may have a negative impact on the quality of life and economic functioning of food allergic consumers and their families. Food allergies may also result in substantial costs for society overall in terms of health care costs and absenteeism. Novel foods are continuously being developed and introduced onto the European market. The novelty of a food can be the result of: (1) genetic modification (GM) of the food itself, or its production using genetically modified organisms, (2) the application of novel processing techniques, or (3) the food in question having no prior history of consumption in general, or in a specific region or country. One potential benefit of novel foods is that of hypoallergenicity, although there is the potential risk that new proteins are introduced into the human food chain together with the novel foods. The aim of the research presented in this thesis is to investigate whether novel foods can be used as part of an allergy management strategy. The issues associated with novel foods and food allergy are identified and insight is gained in stakeholder and consumer attitudes towards the application of novel foods as allergy management strategy. In addition, the existing novel food legislation regarding novel foods is reviewed with respect to risks (and benefits) of novel foods associated with food allergy. The results show that that although hypoallergenic novel foods can have some positive contribution to food allergy management, their influence remains limited because many other factors other than the available foods cause the food allergy problems. Overall, this research contributes to a better understanding of the impact of food allergy on daily lives of food allergic consumers and shows that although hypoallergenic novel foods can facilitate allergen avoidance, their influence remains limited because many other factors, such as the recognition of their allergy by their social environment cause the food allergy problems. Nevertheless, considering that the food allergy management options are limited, the contribution that hypoallergenic novel foods, which can be replacement for allergenic foods may be valuable for consumers who are allergic to foods that are easy to recognise and avoid.

KW - voedselallergieën

KW - nieuwe voedingsmiddelen

KW - houding van consumenten

KW - voedselintolerantie

KW - aanvaardbaarheid

KW - consumenten

KW - bedrijfsvoering

KW - controle

KW - kwaliteit van het leven

KW - food allergies

KW - novel foods

KW - consumer attitudes

KW - food intolerance

KW - acceptability

KW - consumers

KW - management

KW - control

KW - quality of life

M3 - internal PhD, WU

SN - 9789085854494

PB - Wageningen University

CY - Wageningen

ER -