Nonhost resistance of barley is successfully manifested against Magnaporthe grisea and a closely related Pennisetum-infecting lineage but is overcome by Magnaporthe oryzae

N. Zellerhoff, B. Jarosch, J.Z. Groenewald, P.W. Crous, U. Schaffrath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Magnaporthe oryzae is a major pathogen of rice (Oryza sativa L.) but is also able to infect other grasses, including barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Here, we report a study using Magnaporthe isolates collected from other host plant species to evaluate their capacity to infect barley. A nonhost type of resistance was detected in barley against isolates derived from genera Pennisetum (fontaingrass) or Digitaria (crabgrass), but no resistance occurred in response to isolates from rice, genus Eleusine (goosegrass), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), or maize (Zea mays L.), respectively. Restriction of pathogen growth in the nonhost interaction was investigated microscopically and compared with compatible interactions. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify fungal biomass in both types of interaction. The phylogenetic relationship among the Magnaporthe isolates used in this study was investigated by inferring gene trees for fragments of three genes, actin, calmodulin, and ß-tubulin. Based on phylogenetic analysis, we could distinguish different species that were strictly correlated with the ability of the isolates to infect barley. We demonstrated that investigating specific host interaction phenotypes for a range of pathogen isolates can accurately highlight genetic diversity within a pathogen population
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1014-1022
JournalMolecular Plant-Microbe Interactions
Volume19
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Keywords

  • host species-specificity
  • rice blast fungus
  • foxtail millet
  • genetic cross
  • primer sets
  • cell-death
  • plants
  • wheat
  • identification
  • pathogens

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