Non-genetic variance in pigs: genetic analysis of reproduction and production traits

E.B. Sell-Kubiak

Research output: Thesisinternal PhD, WUAcademic

Abstract

Abstract

Sell-Kubiak, E. (2015). Non-genetic variance in pigs: genetic analysis of reproduction and production traits. PhD thesis, Wageningen University, The Netherlands

The main objective of this thesis was to study the origin of random variance in reproduction and production traits of pigs. In pig breeding for many traits it is important not only to improve the reproduction and production trait itself, but also its variation. The variance of traits can be used to improve pigs’ productivity, and potentially also to improve uniformity of traits. Results presented in Chapters 2 and 3 show that the proposed approach to explore the origin of common litter variance was not successful. The impact of various sow features on growth rate and feed intake of grow-finish pigs was very small. More importantly, sow features did not explain the phenotypic variance due to common litter effects found in production traits of pigs. In Chapters 4 and 5 the residual variance of birth weight and litter size were found to have a genetic component. The genetic coefficient of variation at residual standard deviation level (GCVSDe) was proposed as a measure of expressing the potential response to selection (Chapter 4). For both traits the estimated GCVSDe was about 10%, indicating sufficient potential for response to selection. In Chapter 4 it was shown that analyzing variation in traits with Double Hierarchical Generalized Linear model (DHGLM) was highly comparable with the conventional analysis of standard deviation of a trait. The correlation between the additive genetic effects for birth weight and the residual variance was 0.6 (Chapter 4), whereas for litter size (TNB) and its residual variance (varTNB) this correlation was 0.5 (Chapter 5). Those moderate correlations are an important indication of the direction of correlated selection response in the mean of those traits. In Chapter 5 in a genome-wide association study for litter size variation, the significant SNPs explained 0.83% of total genetic variance in TNB and 1.44% in varTNB. The most significant SNP explained 0.4% of genetic variance in TNB (chromosome 11) and 0.5% in varTNB (chromosome 7). One of the possible candidate genes for varTNB on chromosome 7 is heat shock protein (HSPCB). Studying the residual variance of traits with DHGLM has a great potential to serve as an alternative to conventional analysis to study and to select for improved uniformity of various traits. Lastly, Chapter 6 focuses on discussion of the findings of this thesis and their overall importance for pig breeding, as well as highly relevant topics for breeding uniform and robust pigs (macro-micro sensitivity analysis and application of genomic selection).

LanguageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • Wageningen University
Supervisors/Advisors
  • van Arendonk, Johan, Promotor
  • Bijma, Piter, Co-promotor
  • Mulder, Herman, Co-promotor
Award date22 Jun 2015
Place of PublicationWageningen
Publisher
Print ISBNs9789462573291
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

genetic techniques and protocols
swine
litter size
livestock breeding
genetic variance
chromosomes
litters (young animals)
birth weight
sows
linear models
selection response
heat shock proteins
phenotypic variation
marker-assisted selection
Netherlands
feed intake
breeding
genes

Keywords

  • pigs
  • animal breeding
  • reproduction
  • animal production
  • genetic analysis
  • genetic variance
  • genomics
  • phenotypic variation

Cite this

Sell-Kubiak, E. B. (2015). Non-genetic variance in pigs: genetic analysis of reproduction and production traits. Wageningen: Wageningen University.
Sell-Kubiak, E.B.. / Non-genetic variance in pigs: genetic analysis of reproduction and production traits. Wageningen : Wageningen University, 2015. 186 p.
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Sell-Kubiak, EB 2015, 'Non-genetic variance in pigs: genetic analysis of reproduction and production traits', Doctor of Philosophy, Wageningen University, Wageningen.

Non-genetic variance in pigs: genetic analysis of reproduction and production traits. / Sell-Kubiak, E.B.

Wageningen : Wageningen University, 2015. 186 p.

Research output: Thesisinternal PhD, WUAcademic

TY - THES

T1 - Non-genetic variance in pigs: genetic analysis of reproduction and production traits

AU - Sell-Kubiak, E.B.

N1 - WU thesis 6078

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Abstract Sell-Kubiak, E. (2015). Non-genetic variance in pigs: genetic analysis of reproduction and production traits. PhD thesis, Wageningen University, The Netherlands The main objective of this thesis was to study the origin of random variance in reproduction and production traits of pigs. In pig breeding for many traits it is important not only to improve the reproduction and production trait itself, but also its variation. The variance of traits can be used to improve pigs’ productivity, and potentially also to improve uniformity of traits. Results presented in Chapters 2 and 3 show that the proposed approach to explore the origin of common litter variance was not successful. The impact of various sow features on growth rate and feed intake of grow-finish pigs was very small. More importantly, sow features did not explain the phenotypic variance due to common litter effects found in production traits of pigs. In Chapters 4 and 5 the residual variance of birth weight and litter size were found to have a genetic component. The genetic coefficient of variation at residual standard deviation level (GCVSDe) was proposed as a measure of expressing the potential response to selection (Chapter 4). For both traits the estimated GCVSDe was about 10%, indicating sufficient potential for response to selection. In Chapter 4 it was shown that analyzing variation in traits with Double Hierarchical Generalized Linear model (DHGLM) was highly comparable with the conventional analysis of standard deviation of a trait. The correlation between the additive genetic effects for birth weight and the residual variance was 0.6 (Chapter 4), whereas for litter size (TNB) and its residual variance (varTNB) this correlation was 0.5 (Chapter 5). Those moderate correlations are an important indication of the direction of correlated selection response in the mean of those traits. In Chapter 5 in a genome-wide association study for litter size variation, the significant SNPs explained 0.83% of total genetic variance in TNB and 1.44% in varTNB. The most significant SNP explained 0.4% of genetic variance in TNB (chromosome 11) and 0.5% in varTNB (chromosome 7). One of the possible candidate genes for varTNB on chromosome 7 is heat shock protein (HSPCB). Studying the residual variance of traits with DHGLM has a great potential to serve as an alternative to conventional analysis to study and to select for improved uniformity of various traits. Lastly, Chapter 6 focuses on discussion of the findings of this thesis and their overall importance for pig breeding, as well as highly relevant topics for breeding uniform and robust pigs (macro-micro sensitivity analysis and application of genomic selection).

AB - Abstract Sell-Kubiak, E. (2015). Non-genetic variance in pigs: genetic analysis of reproduction and production traits. PhD thesis, Wageningen University, The Netherlands The main objective of this thesis was to study the origin of random variance in reproduction and production traits of pigs. In pig breeding for many traits it is important not only to improve the reproduction and production trait itself, but also its variation. The variance of traits can be used to improve pigs’ productivity, and potentially also to improve uniformity of traits. Results presented in Chapters 2 and 3 show that the proposed approach to explore the origin of common litter variance was not successful. The impact of various sow features on growth rate and feed intake of grow-finish pigs was very small. More importantly, sow features did not explain the phenotypic variance due to common litter effects found in production traits of pigs. In Chapters 4 and 5 the residual variance of birth weight and litter size were found to have a genetic component. The genetic coefficient of variation at residual standard deviation level (GCVSDe) was proposed as a measure of expressing the potential response to selection (Chapter 4). For both traits the estimated GCVSDe was about 10%, indicating sufficient potential for response to selection. In Chapter 4 it was shown that analyzing variation in traits with Double Hierarchical Generalized Linear model (DHGLM) was highly comparable with the conventional analysis of standard deviation of a trait. The correlation between the additive genetic effects for birth weight and the residual variance was 0.6 (Chapter 4), whereas for litter size (TNB) and its residual variance (varTNB) this correlation was 0.5 (Chapter 5). Those moderate correlations are an important indication of the direction of correlated selection response in the mean of those traits. In Chapter 5 in a genome-wide association study for litter size variation, the significant SNPs explained 0.83% of total genetic variance in TNB and 1.44% in varTNB. The most significant SNP explained 0.4% of genetic variance in TNB (chromosome 11) and 0.5% in varTNB (chromosome 7). One of the possible candidate genes for varTNB on chromosome 7 is heat shock protein (HSPCB). Studying the residual variance of traits with DHGLM has a great potential to serve as an alternative to conventional analysis to study and to select for improved uniformity of various traits. Lastly, Chapter 6 focuses on discussion of the findings of this thesis and their overall importance for pig breeding, as well as highly relevant topics for breeding uniform and robust pigs (macro-micro sensitivity analysis and application of genomic selection).

KW - varkens

KW - dierveredeling

KW - voortplanting

KW - dierlijke productie

KW - genetische analyse

KW - genotypische variatie

KW - genomica

KW - fenotypische variatie

KW - pigs

KW - animal breeding

KW - reproduction

KW - animal production

KW - genetic analysis

KW - genetic variance

KW - genomics

KW - phenotypic variation

M3 - internal PhD, WU

SN - 9789462573291

PB - Wageningen University

CY - Wageningen

ER -

Sell-Kubiak EB. Non-genetic variance in pigs: genetic analysis of reproduction and production traits. Wageningen: Wageningen University, 2015. 186 p.