Nocturnal activity by the primarily diurnal Central American agouti (Dasyprocta punctata) in relation to environmental conditions, resource abundance and predation risk

T.D. Lambert, R.W. Kays, P.A. Jansen, E. Aliaga-Rosse, M. Wikelski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An animal's fitness is in part based on its ability to manage the inherent risks (foraging costs, predation, exposure to disease) with the benefits (resource gain, access to mates, social interactions) of activity (Abrams 1991, Altizer et al. 2003, Lima & Bednekoff 1999, Rubenstein & Hohmann 1989, Wikelski et al. 2001). Thus, understanding an animal's pattern of activity is key to understanding behavioural and ecological processes. However, while numerous laboratory methodologies are available to continuously quantify activity over long periods of time, logistical difficulties have greatly hindered activity studies of animals in the field (DeCoursey 1990).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)211-215
JournalJournal of Tropical Ecology
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Keywords

  • ocelot leopardus-pardalis
  • tropical forest
  • life-history
  • behavior
  • availability
  • mammals
  • island
  • panama

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