No independent associations between preconception paternal dietary patterns and embryonic growth; the Predict Study

Elsje C. Oostingh, Iris de Vos, Annelies C. Ham, Elske M. Brouwer-Brolsma, Sten P. Willemsen, Alex J. Eggink, Eric A.P. Steegers, Régine P.M. Steegers-Theunissen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background & aim: Several studies show the importance of periconceptional maternal dietary patterns on human embryonic growth. Healthy paternal nutrition has been associated with better semen quality and fecundability, however, evidence on the impact on pregnancy outcome is limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between preconception paternal dietary patterns and first trimester embryonic growth using the parameters longitudinal crown-rump length (CRL) and embryonic volume (EV). Methods: A total of 638 couples were enrolled in the Rotterdam Periconceptional Cohort and received longitudinal three dimensional transvaginal ultrasound scans from 7+0 up to 12+0 weeks of gestation. Virtual reality software was used to perform offline measurements of the embryonic CRL and EV. Food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) were used to estimate habitual food intake in couples. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to identify paternal and maternal dietary patterns. Linear mixed models adjusted for potential confounders were applied to analyze associations between paternal and maternal dietary patterns and embryonic growth parameters. Results: The paternal dietary patterns retrieved were identified as “Whole wheat grains and Vegetables”, “Sauces and Snacks Refined Grains”, “Fish and Legumes” and explained 27.5% of the total variance of the dietary intake. No significant additional effects, independent of maternal dietary patters and other maternal and paternal potential confounders, were shown of these paternal dietary patterns on embryonic growth in spontaneous or IVF/ICSI pregnancies. Conclusion: No significant effects of paternal dietary patterns independent of maternal dietary patters and other parental potential confounders on embryonic growth parameters could be established in spontaneous or IVF/ICSI pregnancies. The biological importance of paternal nutrition on semen quality, however, supports the need of periconceptional tailored nutritional counselling of couples trying to conceive.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2333-2341
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Nutrition
Volume38
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2019

Fingerprint

Mothers
Growth
Crown-Rump Length
Semen Analysis
Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injections
Pregnancy
Snacks
First Pregnancy Trimester
Pregnancy Outcome
Principal Component Analysis
Fabaceae
Vegetables
Triticum
Fertility
Counseling
Linear Models
Software
Eating
Food

Keywords

  • 3D ultrasound
  • Crown-rump length
  • Embryonic volume
  • Nutrition
  • Periconception period
  • Virtual reality

Cite this

Oostingh, E. C., de Vos, I., Ham, A. C., Brouwer-Brolsma, E. M., Willemsen, S. P., Eggink, A. J., ... Steegers-Theunissen, R. P. M. (2019). No independent associations between preconception paternal dietary patterns and embryonic growth; the Predict Study. Clinical Nutrition, 38(5), 2333-2341. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2018.10.011
Oostingh, Elsje C. ; de Vos, Iris ; Ham, Annelies C. ; Brouwer-Brolsma, Elske M. ; Willemsen, Sten P. ; Eggink, Alex J. ; Steegers, Eric A.P. ; Steegers-Theunissen, Régine P.M. / No independent associations between preconception paternal dietary patterns and embryonic growth; the Predict Study. In: Clinical Nutrition. 2019 ; Vol. 38, No. 5. pp. 2333-2341.
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title = "No independent associations between preconception paternal dietary patterns and embryonic growth; the Predict Study",
abstract = "Background & aim: Several studies show the importance of periconceptional maternal dietary patterns on human embryonic growth. Healthy paternal nutrition has been associated with better semen quality and fecundability, however, evidence on the impact on pregnancy outcome is limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between preconception paternal dietary patterns and first trimester embryonic growth using the parameters longitudinal crown-rump length (CRL) and embryonic volume (EV). Methods: A total of 638 couples were enrolled in the Rotterdam Periconceptional Cohort and received longitudinal three dimensional transvaginal ultrasound scans from 7+0 up to 12+0 weeks of gestation. Virtual reality software was used to perform offline measurements of the embryonic CRL and EV. Food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) were used to estimate habitual food intake in couples. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to identify paternal and maternal dietary patterns. Linear mixed models adjusted for potential confounders were applied to analyze associations between paternal and maternal dietary patterns and embryonic growth parameters. Results: The paternal dietary patterns retrieved were identified as “Whole wheat grains and Vegetables”, “Sauces and Snacks Refined Grains”, “Fish and Legumes” and explained 27.5{\%} of the total variance of the dietary intake. No significant additional effects, independent of maternal dietary patters and other maternal and paternal potential confounders, were shown of these paternal dietary patterns on embryonic growth in spontaneous or IVF/ICSI pregnancies. Conclusion: No significant effects of paternal dietary patterns independent of maternal dietary patters and other parental potential confounders on embryonic growth parameters could be established in spontaneous or IVF/ICSI pregnancies. The biological importance of paternal nutrition on semen quality, however, supports the need of periconceptional tailored nutritional counselling of couples trying to conceive.",
keywords = "3D ultrasound, Crown-rump length, Embryonic volume, Nutrition, Periconception period, Virtual reality",
author = "Oostingh, {Elsje C.} and {de Vos}, Iris and Ham, {Annelies C.} and Brouwer-Brolsma, {Elske M.} and Willemsen, {Sten P.} and Eggink, {Alex J.} and Steegers, {Eric A.P.} and Steegers-Theunissen, {R{\'e}gine P.M.}",
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month = "10",
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doi = "10.1016/j.clnu.2018.10.011",
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Oostingh, EC, de Vos, I, Ham, AC, Brouwer-Brolsma, EM, Willemsen, SP, Eggink, AJ, Steegers, EAP & Steegers-Theunissen, RPM 2019, 'No independent associations between preconception paternal dietary patterns and embryonic growth; the Predict Study', Clinical Nutrition, vol. 38, no. 5, pp. 2333-2341. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2018.10.011

No independent associations between preconception paternal dietary patterns and embryonic growth; the Predict Study. / Oostingh, Elsje C.; de Vos, Iris; Ham, Annelies C.; Brouwer-Brolsma, Elske M.; Willemsen, Sten P.; Eggink, Alex J.; Steegers, Eric A.P.; Steegers-Theunissen, Régine P.M.

In: Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 38, No. 5, 01.10.2019, p. 2333-2341.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - No independent associations between preconception paternal dietary patterns and embryonic growth; the Predict Study

AU - Oostingh, Elsje C.

AU - de Vos, Iris

AU - Ham, Annelies C.

AU - Brouwer-Brolsma, Elske M.

AU - Willemsen, Sten P.

AU - Eggink, Alex J.

AU - Steegers, Eric A.P.

AU - Steegers-Theunissen, Régine P.M.

PY - 2019/10/1

Y1 - 2019/10/1

N2 - Background & aim: Several studies show the importance of periconceptional maternal dietary patterns on human embryonic growth. Healthy paternal nutrition has been associated with better semen quality and fecundability, however, evidence on the impact on pregnancy outcome is limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between preconception paternal dietary patterns and first trimester embryonic growth using the parameters longitudinal crown-rump length (CRL) and embryonic volume (EV). Methods: A total of 638 couples were enrolled in the Rotterdam Periconceptional Cohort and received longitudinal three dimensional transvaginal ultrasound scans from 7+0 up to 12+0 weeks of gestation. Virtual reality software was used to perform offline measurements of the embryonic CRL and EV. Food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) were used to estimate habitual food intake in couples. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to identify paternal and maternal dietary patterns. Linear mixed models adjusted for potential confounders were applied to analyze associations between paternal and maternal dietary patterns and embryonic growth parameters. Results: The paternal dietary patterns retrieved were identified as “Whole wheat grains and Vegetables”, “Sauces and Snacks Refined Grains”, “Fish and Legumes” and explained 27.5% of the total variance of the dietary intake. No significant additional effects, independent of maternal dietary patters and other maternal and paternal potential confounders, were shown of these paternal dietary patterns on embryonic growth in spontaneous or IVF/ICSI pregnancies. Conclusion: No significant effects of paternal dietary patterns independent of maternal dietary patters and other parental potential confounders on embryonic growth parameters could be established in spontaneous or IVF/ICSI pregnancies. The biological importance of paternal nutrition on semen quality, however, supports the need of periconceptional tailored nutritional counselling of couples trying to conceive.

AB - Background & aim: Several studies show the importance of periconceptional maternal dietary patterns on human embryonic growth. Healthy paternal nutrition has been associated with better semen quality and fecundability, however, evidence on the impact on pregnancy outcome is limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between preconception paternal dietary patterns and first trimester embryonic growth using the parameters longitudinal crown-rump length (CRL) and embryonic volume (EV). Methods: A total of 638 couples were enrolled in the Rotterdam Periconceptional Cohort and received longitudinal three dimensional transvaginal ultrasound scans from 7+0 up to 12+0 weeks of gestation. Virtual reality software was used to perform offline measurements of the embryonic CRL and EV. Food frequency questionnaires (FFQ) were used to estimate habitual food intake in couples. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to identify paternal and maternal dietary patterns. Linear mixed models adjusted for potential confounders were applied to analyze associations between paternal and maternal dietary patterns and embryonic growth parameters. Results: The paternal dietary patterns retrieved were identified as “Whole wheat grains and Vegetables”, “Sauces and Snacks Refined Grains”, “Fish and Legumes” and explained 27.5% of the total variance of the dietary intake. No significant additional effects, independent of maternal dietary patters and other maternal and paternal potential confounders, were shown of these paternal dietary patterns on embryonic growth in spontaneous or IVF/ICSI pregnancies. Conclusion: No significant effects of paternal dietary patterns independent of maternal dietary patters and other parental potential confounders on embryonic growth parameters could be established in spontaneous or IVF/ICSI pregnancies. The biological importance of paternal nutrition on semen quality, however, supports the need of periconceptional tailored nutritional counselling of couples trying to conceive.

KW - 3D ultrasound

KW - Crown-rump length

KW - Embryonic volume

KW - Nutrition

KW - Periconception period

KW - Virtual reality

U2 - 10.1016/j.clnu.2018.10.011

DO - 10.1016/j.clnu.2018.10.011

M3 - Article

VL - 38

SP - 2333

EP - 2341

JO - Clinical Nutrition

JF - Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0261-5614

IS - 5

ER -