No differences in muscle protein synthesis rates following ingestion of wheat protein, milk protein, and their protein blend in healthy, young males

Philippe J.M. Pinckaers, Imre W.K. Kouw, Floris K. Hendriks, Janneau M.X. Van Kranenburg, Lisette C.P.G.M. De Groot, Lex B. Verdijk, Tim Snijders, Luc J.C. Van Loon*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Plant-derived proteins have been suggested to have less anabolic properties when compared with animal-derived proteins. Whether blends of plant-and animal-derived proteins can compensate for their lesser anabolic potential has not been assessed. This study compares post-prandial muscle protein synthesis rates following the ingestion of milk protein with wheat protein or a blend of wheat plus milk protein in healthy, young males. In a randomized, double blind, parallel-group design, 36 males (23±3 y) received a primed continuous L-[ring-13C6]-phenylalanine infusion after which they ingested 30 g milk protein (MILK), 30 g wheat protein (WHEAT), or a 30 g blend combining 15 g wheat plus 15 g milk protein (WHEAT+MILK). Blood and muscle biopsies were collected frequently for 5 hours to assess post-prandial plasma amino acid profiles and subsequent myofibrillar protein synthesis rates. Ingestion of protein increased myofibrillar protein synthesis rates in all treatments (P<0.001). Post-prandial myofibrillar protein synthesis rates did not differ between MILK vs WHEAT (0.053±0.013 vs 0.056±0.012™h-1, respectively; t-test P=0.56) or between MILK vs WHEAT+MILK (0.053±0.013 vs 0.059±0.025™h-1, respectively; t-test P=0.46). In conclusion, ingestion of 30 g milk protein, 30 g wheat protein, or a blend of 15 g wheat plus 15 g milk protein increases muscle protein synthesis rates in young males. Furthermore, muscle protein synthesis rates following the ingestion of 30 g milk protein do not differ from rates observed after ingesting 30 g wheat protein or a blend with 15 g milk plus 15 g wheat protein in healthy, young males.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-38
Number of pages38
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 18 Feb 2021

Keywords

  • dairy
  • fractional synthesis rate
  • muscle protein synthesis
  • plant based proteins
  • protein blends
  • young healthy males

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