Nitrification limitation in animal slurries at high temperatures

H.C. Willers, P.J.L. Derikx, P.J.W. ten Have, T.K. Vijn

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    Abstract

    Nitrification rates in two types of animal slurry were measured at temperatures between 20 and 60°C. The rates were assessed in rapid laboratory assays using samples from aeration tanks of large scale treatment plants for pig or veal-calf slurry. Maximum nitrification rates for the two slurries were observed around 35 and 40°C. For veal-calf slurry, the observed maximum rate was 1.5 mmol NH4 + per gram volatile suspended solids per hour. The maximum rate for digested pig slurry was 0.11 mmol g-1h-1). For digested pig slurry, a sharp drop in nitrification rate was observed at temperatures higher than 40°C. The rate in veal-calf slurry dropped at temperatures higher than 45°C. No nitrification was observed above 45°C in digested pig slurry and above 50°C in veal-calf slurry. | Nitrification rates in two types of animal slurry were measured at temperatures between 20 and 60 °C. The rates were assessed in rapid laboratory assays using samples from aeration tanks of large-scale treatment plants for pig or veal-calf slurry. Maximum nitrification rates for the two slurries were observed around 35 and 40 °C. For veal-calf slurry, the observed maximum rate was 1.5 mmol NH4 + per gram volatile suspended solids per hour. The maximum rate for digested pig slurry was 0.11 mmol g-1 h-1). For digested pig slurry, a sharp drop in nitrification rate was observed at temperatures higher than 40 °C. The rate in veal-calf slurry dropped at temperatures higher than 45 °C. No nitrification was observed above 45 °C in digested pig slurry and above 50 °C in veal-calf slurry.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)47-54
    JournalBioresource Technology
    Volume64
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1998

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