Newsworthiness and story prominence: How the presence of news factors relates to upfront position and length of news stories

Mark Boukes*, Natalie P. Jones, Rens Vliegenthart

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The presence of news factors in journalistic products has been abundantly researched, but investigations into their actual impact on the news production process are scarce. This study provides a large-scale analysis of why news factors matter: Whether, how, and which news factors affect the prominence of news items and does this differ per outlet type? A manual content analysis of print, online, and television news demonstrates that a larger total number of news factors in a story positively predict an item’s length and likelihood of front-page publication or likelihood of being a newscast’s opening item. News factors ‘conflict’ and ‘eliteness’ have the strongest impact, mixed evidence was found for ‘proximity’ and ‘personification’, whereas relationships with ‘negativity’, ‘influence and relevance’, and ‘continuity’ were mostly insignificant. Fewer differences than expected emerged between outlet types (popular vs quality press). Especially for television news, outlet type (public vs commercial broadcaster) hardly mattered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)98-116
Number of pages19
JournalJournalism
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Content analysis
  • news factors
  • news value theory
  • newsworthiness
  • popular vs quality
  • prominence
  • public vs commercial

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Newsworthiness and story prominence: How the presence of news factors relates to upfront position and length of news stories'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this