Natural Variation in Acute Stress Resistance, DR and Lifespan in a Multi-Parent Recombinant Inbred Line Panel in C. elegans

J. Stastna, L.B. Snoek, J.A.G. Riksen, A. Vujakovic, H. Schulenburg, J.E. Kammenga, S.C. Harvey

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterAcademic

Abstract

Stress and lifespan are closely related, with many mutations that alter lifespan also affecting stress-response and nutrient sensing. Experiments on stress can therefore provide insight into the mechanisms of ageing and C. elegans is an important model species for such studies. Most studies in C. elegans have however been limited to using just one canonical strain (N2) and many studies of natural variation have relied on differences between N2 and a small number of other genotypes. Given the N2 was maintained in the continuous culture for about 13 years it is likely that it has adapted to laboratory conditions. This potentially constrains the detection and functional analysis of allelic variants that could play major roles in determining the control of complex traits. Knowing that genetic variation can significantly influence stress response a closer look at the freshly derived wild isolates is needed to obtain more realistic picture. Here, we present an analysis of multiple acute stress responses (cold shock, heat shock and oxidative stress), of dietary restriction and of lifespan for a new panel of 200, sequenced and genotyped recombinant inbred lines (RILs) without N2. These RILs are derived from four wild isolates which are representative of genotypically distinct groups of C. elegans isolates from France. The RILs are therefore good representatives of natural genetic variants and do not contain the lab adaptation alleles found in N2. Our analyses identify extensive variation between the RILs, identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for all traits, and identify co-localising QTLs for several sets of traits. In conjunction with the gene expression data available for these RILs, we are now analysing candidate genes for these QTLs.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - May 2016
EventEuropean Worm Meeting (EWM) 2016 - Max Delbrück Center (MDC), Berlin, Germany
Duration: 1 Jun 20163 Jun 2016

Conference

ConferenceEuropean Worm Meeting (EWM) 2016
CountryGermany
CityBerlin
Period1/06/163/06/16

Fingerprint

stress tolerance
inbred lines
quantitative trait loci
stress response
dietary restriction
heat stress
oxidative stress
France
alleles
mutation
gene expression
genetic variation
genotype
nutrients
genes
cold shock response

Cite this

Stastna, J., Snoek, L. B., Riksen, J. A. G., Vujakovic, A., Schulenburg, H., Kammenga, J. E., & Harvey, S. C. (2016). Natural Variation in Acute Stress Resistance, DR and Lifespan in a Multi-Parent Recombinant Inbred Line Panel in C. elegans. Poster session presented at European Worm Meeting (EWM) 2016, Berlin, Germany.
Stastna, J. ; Snoek, L.B. ; Riksen, J.A.G. ; Vujakovic, A. ; Schulenburg, H. ; Kammenga, J.E. ; Harvey, S.C. / Natural Variation in Acute Stress Resistance, DR and Lifespan in a Multi-Parent Recombinant Inbred Line Panel in C. elegans. Poster session presented at European Worm Meeting (EWM) 2016, Berlin, Germany.
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Stastna, J, Snoek, LB, Riksen, JAG, Vujakovic, A, Schulenburg, H, Kammenga, JE & Harvey, SC 2016, 'Natural Variation in Acute Stress Resistance, DR and Lifespan in a Multi-Parent Recombinant Inbred Line Panel in C. elegans', Berlin, Germany, 1/06/16 - 3/06/16, .

Natural Variation in Acute Stress Resistance, DR and Lifespan in a Multi-Parent Recombinant Inbred Line Panel in C. elegans. / Stastna, J.; Snoek, L.B.; Riksen, J.A.G.; Vujakovic, A.; Schulenburg, H.; Kammenga, J.E.; Harvey, S.C.

2016. Poster session presented at European Worm Meeting (EWM) 2016, Berlin, Germany.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterAcademic

TY - CONF

T1 - Natural Variation in Acute Stress Resistance, DR and Lifespan in a Multi-Parent Recombinant Inbred Line Panel in C. elegans

AU - Stastna, J.

AU - Snoek, L.B.

AU - Riksen, J.A.G.

AU - Vujakovic, A.

AU - Schulenburg, H.

AU - Kammenga, J.E.

AU - Harvey, S.C.

PY - 2016/5

Y1 - 2016/5

N2 - Stress and lifespan are closely related, with many mutations that alter lifespan also affecting stress-response and nutrient sensing. Experiments on stress can therefore provide insight into the mechanisms of ageing and C. elegans is an important model species for such studies. Most studies in C. elegans have however been limited to using just one canonical strain (N2) and many studies of natural variation have relied on differences between N2 and a small number of other genotypes. Given the N2 was maintained in the continuous culture for about 13 years it is likely that it has adapted to laboratory conditions. This potentially constrains the detection and functional analysis of allelic variants that could play major roles in determining the control of complex traits. Knowing that genetic variation can significantly influence stress response a closer look at the freshly derived wild isolates is needed to obtain more realistic picture. Here, we present an analysis of multiple acute stress responses (cold shock, heat shock and oxidative stress), of dietary restriction and of lifespan for a new panel of 200, sequenced and genotyped recombinant inbred lines (RILs) without N2. These RILs are derived from four wild isolates which are representative of genotypically distinct groups of C. elegans isolates from France. The RILs are therefore good representatives of natural genetic variants and do not contain the lab adaptation alleles found in N2. Our analyses identify extensive variation between the RILs, identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for all traits, and identify co-localising QTLs for several sets of traits. In conjunction with the gene expression data available for these RILs, we are now analysing candidate genes for these QTLs.

AB - Stress and lifespan are closely related, with many mutations that alter lifespan also affecting stress-response and nutrient sensing. Experiments on stress can therefore provide insight into the mechanisms of ageing and C. elegans is an important model species for such studies. Most studies in C. elegans have however been limited to using just one canonical strain (N2) and many studies of natural variation have relied on differences between N2 and a small number of other genotypes. Given the N2 was maintained in the continuous culture for about 13 years it is likely that it has adapted to laboratory conditions. This potentially constrains the detection and functional analysis of allelic variants that could play major roles in determining the control of complex traits. Knowing that genetic variation can significantly influence stress response a closer look at the freshly derived wild isolates is needed to obtain more realistic picture. Here, we present an analysis of multiple acute stress responses (cold shock, heat shock and oxidative stress), of dietary restriction and of lifespan for a new panel of 200, sequenced and genotyped recombinant inbred lines (RILs) without N2. These RILs are derived from four wild isolates which are representative of genotypically distinct groups of C. elegans isolates from France. The RILs are therefore good representatives of natural genetic variants and do not contain the lab adaptation alleles found in N2. Our analyses identify extensive variation between the RILs, identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for all traits, and identify co-localising QTLs for several sets of traits. In conjunction with the gene expression data available for these RILs, we are now analysing candidate genes for these QTLs.

M3 - Poster

ER -

Stastna J, Snoek LB, Riksen JAG, Vujakovic A, Schulenburg H, Kammenga JE et al. Natural Variation in Acute Stress Resistance, DR and Lifespan in a Multi-Parent Recombinant Inbred Line Panel in C. elegans. 2016. Poster session presented at European Worm Meeting (EWM) 2016, Berlin, Germany.