Natural hybridization between Populus nigra L. and P. x canadensis Moench. Hybrid offspring competes for niches along the Rhine river in the Netherlands

M.J.M. Smulders, R. Beringen, R. Volosyanchuk, A. Vanden Broeck, J. van der Schoot, P.F.P. Arens, B. Vosman

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    50 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Black poplar (Populus nigra L.) is a major species for European riparian forests but its abundance has decreased over the decades due to human influences. For restoration of floodplain woodlands, the remaining black poplar stands may act as source population. A potential problem is that P. nigra and Populus deltoides have contributed to many interspecific hybrids, which have been planted in large numbers. As these Populus x canadensis clones have the possibility to intercross with wild P. nigra trees, their offspring could establish themselves along European rivers. In this study, we have sampled 44 poplar seedlings and young trees that occurred spontaneously along the Rhine river and its tributaries in the Netherlands. Along these rivers, only a few native P. nigra L. populations exist in combination with many planted cultivated P. x canadensis trees. By comparison to reference material from P. nigra, P. deltoides and P. x canadensis, species-specific AFLP bands and microsatellite alleles indicated that nearly half of the sampled trees were not pure P. nigra but progeny of natural hybridisation that had colonised the Rhine river banks. The posterior probability method as implemented in NewHybrids using microsatellite data was the superior method in establishing the most likely parentage. The results of this study indicate that offspring of hybrid cultivated poplars compete for the same ecological niche as native black poplars.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)663-675
    JournalTree Genetics and Genomes
    Volume4
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2008

    Fingerprint

    Populus
    Rhine River
    Populus nigra
    Rivers
    Netherlands
    niche
    niches
    hybridization
    river
    parentage
    river bank
    riparian forest
    Populus deltoides
    floodplain
    clone
    tributary
    woodland
    allele
    seedling
    Microsatellite Repeats

    Keywords

    • poplar populus
    • black poplar
    • microsatellite markers
    • cultivated poplars
    • genetic diversity
    • populations
    • deltoides
    • aflp
    • rapd
    • dna

    Cite this

    @article{fdd49de8c0a14981bb45eeffdc84c6ec,
    title = "Natural hybridization between Populus nigra L. and P. x canadensis Moench. Hybrid offspring competes for niches along the Rhine river in the Netherlands",
    abstract = "Black poplar (Populus nigra L.) is a major species for European riparian forests but its abundance has decreased over the decades due to human influences. For restoration of floodplain woodlands, the remaining black poplar stands may act as source population. A potential problem is that P. nigra and Populus deltoides have contributed to many interspecific hybrids, which have been planted in large numbers. As these Populus x canadensis clones have the possibility to intercross with wild P. nigra trees, their offspring could establish themselves along European rivers. In this study, we have sampled 44 poplar seedlings and young trees that occurred spontaneously along the Rhine river and its tributaries in the Netherlands. Along these rivers, only a few native P. nigra L. populations exist in combination with many planted cultivated P. x canadensis trees. By comparison to reference material from P. nigra, P. deltoides and P. x canadensis, species-specific AFLP bands and microsatellite alleles indicated that nearly half of the sampled trees were not pure P. nigra but progeny of natural hybridisation that had colonised the Rhine river banks. The posterior probability method as implemented in NewHybrids using microsatellite data was the superior method in establishing the most likely parentage. The results of this study indicate that offspring of hybrid cultivated poplars compete for the same ecological niche as native black poplars.",
    keywords = "poplar populus, black poplar, microsatellite markers, cultivated poplars, genetic diversity, populations, deltoides, aflp, rapd, dna",
    author = "M.J.M. Smulders and R. Beringen and R. Volosyanchuk and {Vanden Broeck}, A. and {van der Schoot}, J. and P.F.P. Arens and B. Vosman",
    year = "2008",
    doi = "10.1007/s11295-008-0141-5",
    language = "English",
    volume = "4",
    pages = "663--675",
    journal = "Tree Genetics and Genomes",
    issn = "1614-2942",
    publisher = "Springer Verlag",
    number = "4",

    }

    Natural hybridization between Populus nigra L. and P. x canadensis Moench. Hybrid offspring competes for niches along the Rhine river in the Netherlands. / Smulders, M.J.M.; Beringen, R.; Volosyanchuk, R.; Vanden Broeck, A.; van der Schoot, J.; Arens, P.F.P.; Vosman, B.

    In: Tree Genetics and Genomes, Vol. 4, No. 4, 2008, p. 663-675.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Natural hybridization between Populus nigra L. and P. x canadensis Moench. Hybrid offspring competes for niches along the Rhine river in the Netherlands

    AU - Smulders, M.J.M.

    AU - Beringen, R.

    AU - Volosyanchuk, R.

    AU - Vanden Broeck, A.

    AU - van der Schoot, J.

    AU - Arens, P.F.P.

    AU - Vosman, B.

    PY - 2008

    Y1 - 2008

    N2 - Black poplar (Populus nigra L.) is a major species for European riparian forests but its abundance has decreased over the decades due to human influences. For restoration of floodplain woodlands, the remaining black poplar stands may act as source population. A potential problem is that P. nigra and Populus deltoides have contributed to many interspecific hybrids, which have been planted in large numbers. As these Populus x canadensis clones have the possibility to intercross with wild P. nigra trees, their offspring could establish themselves along European rivers. In this study, we have sampled 44 poplar seedlings and young trees that occurred spontaneously along the Rhine river and its tributaries in the Netherlands. Along these rivers, only a few native P. nigra L. populations exist in combination with many planted cultivated P. x canadensis trees. By comparison to reference material from P. nigra, P. deltoides and P. x canadensis, species-specific AFLP bands and microsatellite alleles indicated that nearly half of the sampled trees were not pure P. nigra but progeny of natural hybridisation that had colonised the Rhine river banks. The posterior probability method as implemented in NewHybrids using microsatellite data was the superior method in establishing the most likely parentage. The results of this study indicate that offspring of hybrid cultivated poplars compete for the same ecological niche as native black poplars.

    AB - Black poplar (Populus nigra L.) is a major species for European riparian forests but its abundance has decreased over the decades due to human influences. For restoration of floodplain woodlands, the remaining black poplar stands may act as source population. A potential problem is that P. nigra and Populus deltoides have contributed to many interspecific hybrids, which have been planted in large numbers. As these Populus x canadensis clones have the possibility to intercross with wild P. nigra trees, their offspring could establish themselves along European rivers. In this study, we have sampled 44 poplar seedlings and young trees that occurred spontaneously along the Rhine river and its tributaries in the Netherlands. Along these rivers, only a few native P. nigra L. populations exist in combination with many planted cultivated P. x canadensis trees. By comparison to reference material from P. nigra, P. deltoides and P. x canadensis, species-specific AFLP bands and microsatellite alleles indicated that nearly half of the sampled trees were not pure P. nigra but progeny of natural hybridisation that had colonised the Rhine river banks. The posterior probability method as implemented in NewHybrids using microsatellite data was the superior method in establishing the most likely parentage. The results of this study indicate that offspring of hybrid cultivated poplars compete for the same ecological niche as native black poplars.

    KW - poplar populus

    KW - black poplar

    KW - microsatellite markers

    KW - cultivated poplars

    KW - genetic diversity

    KW - populations

    KW - deltoides

    KW - aflp

    KW - rapd

    KW - dna

    U2 - 10.1007/s11295-008-0141-5

    DO - 10.1007/s11295-008-0141-5

    M3 - Article

    VL - 4

    SP - 663

    EP - 675

    JO - Tree Genetics and Genomes

    JF - Tree Genetics and Genomes

    SN - 1614-2942

    IS - 4

    ER -