Multivariate phenotypic divergence due to the fixation of beneficial mutations in experimentally evolved lineages of a filamentous fungus

S.E. Schoustra, D. Punzalan, R. Dali, H.D. Rundle, R. Kassen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The potential for evolutionary change is limited by the availability of genetic variation. Mutations are the ultimate source of new alleles, yet there have been few experimental investigations of the role of novel mutations in multivariate phenotypic evolution. Here, we evaluated the degree of multivariate phenotypic divergence observed in a long-term evolution experiment whereby replicate lineages of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans were derived from a single genotype and allowed to fix novel (beneficial) mutations while maintained at two different population sizes. We asked three fundamental questions regarding phenotypic divergence following approximately 800 generations of adaptation: (1) whether divergence was limited by mutational supply, (2) whether divergence proceeded in relatively many (few) multivariate directions, and (3) to what degree phenotypic divergence scaled with changes in fitness (i.e. adaptation). We found no evidence that mutational supply limited phenotypic divergence. Divergence also occurred in all possible phenotypic directions, implying that pleiotropy was either weak or sufficiently variable among new mutations so as not to constrain the direction of multivariate evolution. The degree of total phenotypic divergence from the common ancestor was positively correlated with the extent of adaptation. These results are discussed in the context of the evolution of complex phenotypes through the input of adaptive mutations
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere50305
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume7
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Fungi
mutation
Mutation
fungi
Long Term Evolution (LTE)
Aspergillus
Aspergillus nidulans
pleiotropy
Availability
Population Density
ancestry
population size
Alleles
Genotype
Direction compound
alleles
Phenotype
phenotype
Experiments
genetic variation

Keywords

  • variance-covariance matrices
  • genetic variance
  • aspergillus-nidulans
  • adaptive radiation
  • life-history
  • evolution
  • selection
  • fitness
  • adaptation
  • populations

Cite this

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title = "Multivariate phenotypic divergence due to the fixation of beneficial mutations in experimentally evolved lineages of a filamentous fungus",
abstract = "The potential for evolutionary change is limited by the availability of genetic variation. Mutations are the ultimate source of new alleles, yet there have been few experimental investigations of the role of novel mutations in multivariate phenotypic evolution. Here, we evaluated the degree of multivariate phenotypic divergence observed in a long-term evolution experiment whereby replicate lineages of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans were derived from a single genotype and allowed to fix novel (beneficial) mutations while maintained at two different population sizes. We asked three fundamental questions regarding phenotypic divergence following approximately 800 generations of adaptation: (1) whether divergence was limited by mutational supply, (2) whether divergence proceeded in relatively many (few) multivariate directions, and (3) to what degree phenotypic divergence scaled with changes in fitness (i.e. adaptation). We found no evidence that mutational supply limited phenotypic divergence. Divergence also occurred in all possible phenotypic directions, implying that pleiotropy was either weak or sufficiently variable among new mutations so as not to constrain the direction of multivariate evolution. The degree of total phenotypic divergence from the common ancestor was positively correlated with the extent of adaptation. These results are discussed in the context of the evolution of complex phenotypes through the input of adaptive mutations",
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author = "S.E. Schoustra and D. Punzalan and R. Dali and H.D. Rundle and R. Kassen",
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doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0050305",
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volume = "7",
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Multivariate phenotypic divergence due to the fixation of beneficial mutations in experimentally evolved lineages of a filamentous fungus. / Schoustra, S.E.; Punzalan, D.; Dali, R.; Rundle, H.D.; Kassen, R.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 7, No. 11, e50305, 2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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T1 - Multivariate phenotypic divergence due to the fixation of beneficial mutations in experimentally evolved lineages of a filamentous fungus

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AU - Punzalan, D.

AU - Dali, R.

AU - Rundle, H.D.

AU - Kassen, R.

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

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