Multiple loci and genetic interactions involving flowering time genes regulate stem branching among natural variants of Arabidopsis

X. Huang, J. Ding, S. Effgen, F. Turck, M. Koornneef

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Shoot branching is a major determinant of plant architecture. Genetic variants for reduced stem branching in the axils of cauline leaves of Arabidopsis were found in some natural accessions and also at low frequency in the progeny of multiparent crosses. Detailed genetic analysis using segregating populations derived from backcrosses with the parental lines and bulked segregant analysis was used to identify the allelic variation controlling reduced stem branching. Eight quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to natural variation for reduced stem branching were identified (REDUCED STEM BRANCHING 1-8 (RSB1-8)). Genetic analysis showed that RSB6 and RSB7, corresponding to flowering time genes FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) and FRIGIDA (FRI), epistatically regulate stem branching. Furthermore, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), which corresponds to RSB8 as demonstrated by fine-mapping, transgenic complementation and expression analysis, caused pleiotropic effects not only on flowering time, but, in the specific background of active FRI and FLC alleles, also on the RSB trait. The consequence of allelic variation only expressed in late-flowering genotypes revealed novel and thus far unsuspected roles of several genes well characterized for their roles in flowering time control
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)843-857
JournalNew Phytologist
Volume199
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Keywords

  • quantitative trait loci
  • axillary meristem formation
  • inbred line populations
  • allelic variation
  • inflorescence development
  • thaliana
  • shoot
  • associations
  • architecture
  • adaptation

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