Multi-Use Conflicts in Inshore Waters

Rob Van Ginkel, Nathalie Steins

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Until only quite recently, human activity in Europe’s inshore waters made little impact on marine resources and one activity scarcely interfered with any other. But long term developments such as demographic growth, urbanisation, expanding demand for food and natural resources, the integration of resources into markets, technological innovation, the development of marine transport and the rise of tourism have all increased the level of human impact on coastal areas and resources. Once a domain where only fishers and sailors ventured, the sea is now being used for many other purposes, particularly in the inshore zone. In addition to their continuing importance for fisheries, inshore waters are now commonly used quite intensively for other potentially intrusive activities. The public’s growing demand for entry to the inshore zone has brought about competition and conflicts between various claimants over access to, allocation of and control over coastal space and resources. In addition to multiple use conflicts, intensified use of the coastal zone can also exacerbate resource management problems. Human activities unrelated to fisheries affect marine ecosystems: mineral exploration and development, water based recreation, navigation, dredging, land reclamation, industrial and agricultural waste disposal including the discharge of effluents and the dumping of toxic chemical and nuclear waste, thermal pollution from coastal power stations etc.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInshore Fisheries Management
Place of PublicationDordrecht
PublisherSpringer
Chapter15
Pages257-273
ISBN (Electronic)9789401718929
ISBN (Print)9789048158744
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameInshore Fisheries Management
Volume2
ISSN (Print)1571-3075

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  • Ireland

    Steins, N., 2001, Inshore Fisheries Management. Symes, D. & Phillipson, J. (eds.). Dordrecht: Springer, p. 119-137 Chapter 7. (Inshore Fisheries Management; vol. 2).

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

  • The Role of Aquaculture in Inshore Fisheries

    Steins, N. & Roth, E., 2001, Inshore Fisheries Management. Symes, D. & Phillipson, J. (eds.). Dordrecht: Springer, Vol. 2. p. 223-238 Chapter 13. (Inshore Fisheries Management; vol. 2).

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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