Molecular diagnosis of malaria in the field: development of a novel 1-step nucleic acid lateral flow immunoassay for the detection of all 4 human Plasmodium spp. and its evaluation in Mbita, Kenya

P.F. Mens, A. van Amerongen, P. Sawa, H.D.F.H. Schallig

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    45 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Microscopy is frequently used for malaria diagnosis, but at low parasitemia, it becomes less sensitive and time consuming. Molecular tools allow for specific/sensitive diagnosis, but current formats, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) combined with gel electrophoresis and real-time PCR assays, are difficult to implement in resource-poor settings. Development of a simple, fast, sensitive, and specific detection system, nucleic acid lateral flow immunoassay (NALFIA) for amplified pan-Plasmodium PCR products, is described. The NALFIA lower detection limit is 0.3 to 3 parasites/¿L, 10-fold more sensitive than gel electrophoresis analysis. Evaluating 650 clinically suspected malaria cases with the pan-Plasmodium assay under field conditions (rural Kenya) revealed that NALFIA detected more positives than microscopy (agreement, 95%; ¿ value = 0.85), and there was an excellent agreement between gel electrophoresis and NALFIA (98.5%; ¿ value = 0.96). In conclusion, NALFIA is more sensitive than microscopy and a good alternative to detect PCR products while circumventing using electricity or expensive equipment, making NALFIA the 1st step toward molecular field diagnosis.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)421-427
    JournalDiagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease
    Volume61
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2008

    Keywords

    • sequence-based amplification
    • clinical-diagnosis
    • pcr
    • falciparum
    • samples
    • tests
    • time
    • quantification
    • identification
    • genus

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Molecular diagnosis of malaria in the field: development of a novel 1-step nucleic acid lateral flow immunoassay for the detection of all 4 human Plasmodium spp. and its evaluation in Mbita, Kenya'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this