Molecular analysis of ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete communities in a Pinus sylvestris L. stand reveals long-term increased diversity after removal of litter and humus layers

E. Smit, C. Veenman, J. Baar

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    42 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The number of fruiting bodies of ectomycorrhizal species in pine forests in The Netherlands has decreased dramatically in recent decades. This decrease has been attributed to an increase in nitrogen deposition and the accumulation of litter and humus. The effects of sod cutting and the removal of litter and humus, to restore ectomycorrhizal diversity in a Scots pine forest in Dwingeloo, The Netherlands, were investigated previously from 1990 to 1993. Removal of the litter and humus resulted in a significant increase in the numbers of species and fruiting bodies of ectomycorrhizal fungi. However, until now all data were obtained by counting fruiting bodies and the effects on mycelial development below ground were not assessed. To investigate hyphal development, DNA was extracted from bulk soil and polymerase chain reaction products were obtained by amplification using basidiomycete-specific internal transcribed spacer (ITS) primers. The differences in diversity between the control plots and the treated plots were analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. To assess the species composition and differences, ITS regions of the amplified fragments were cloned and sequenced. Sequences were compared with sequences from GenBank and from fruiting bodies collected from the same plots. Data indicated increased below-ground ectomycorrhizal diversity in the plots that had been subjected to removal of the litter and humus layers
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)49-57
    JournalFEMS Microbiology Ecology
    Volume45
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2003

    Keywords

    • inorganic nitrogen-sources
    • fungal communities
    • muricata forest
    • pure culture
    • scots pine
    • soil fungi
    • deposition
    • mycelium
    • identification
    • netherlands

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