Modulation of event-related potentials to food cues upon sensory-specific satiety

Harriët F.A. Zoon, Kathrin Ohla, Cees de Graaf, Sanne Boesveldt*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Tempting environmental food cues and metabolic signals are important factors in appetite regulation. Food intake reduces liking of food cues that are congruent to the food eaten (sensory-specific satiety). With this study we aimed to assess effects of sensory-specific satiety on neural processing (perceptual and evaluative) of visual and olfactory food cues. Twenty healthy female subjects (age: 20 ± 2 years; BMI: 22 ± 2 kg/m2) participated in two separate test sessions during which they consumed an ad libitum amount of a sweet or savoury meal. Before and after consumption, event-related potentials were recorded in response to visual and olfactory cues signalling high-energy sweet, high-energy savoury, low-energy sweet and low-energy savoury food and non-food items. In general, we observed that food intake led to event-related potentials with an increased negative and decreased positive amplitudes for food, but also non-food cues. Changes were most pronounced in response to high-energy sweet food pictures after a sweet meal, and occurred in early processes of perception (~80–150 ms) and later processes of cognitive evaluation (~300–700 ms). Food intake appears to lead to general changes in neural processing that are related to motivated attention, and sensory-specific changes that reflect decreased positive valence of the stimuli and/or modulation of top-down cognitive control over processing of cues congruent to the food eaten to satiety.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)126-134
JournalPhysiology and Behavior
Volume196
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2018

Keywords

  • Electro-encephalography
  • Food anticipation
  • Food consumption
  • Neural response
  • Olfactory
  • Visual

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