Modeling lipid accumulation in oleaginous fungi in chemostat cultures: I. Development and validation of a chemostat model for Umbelopsis isabellina

P. Meeuwse, J. Tramper, A. Rinzema

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lipid-accumulating fungi may be able to produce biodiesel precursors from agricultural wastes. As a first step in understanding and evaluating their potential, a mathematical model was developed to describe growth, lipid accumulation and substrate consumption of the oleaginous fungus Umbelopsis isabellina (also known as Mortierella isabellina) in submerged chemostat cultures. Key points of the model are: (1) if the C-source supply rate is limited, maintenance has a higher priority than growth, which has a higher priority than lipid production; (2) the maximum specific lipid production rate of the fungus is independent of the actual specific growth rate. Model parameters were obtained from chemostat cultures of U. isabellina grown on mineral media with glucose and NH4+. The model describes the results of chemostat cultures well for D > 0.04 h-1, but it has not been validated for lower dilution rates because of practical problems with the filamentous fungus. Further validation using literature data for oleaginous yeasts is described in part II of this paper. Our model shows that not only the C/N-ratio of the feed, but also the dilution rate highly influences the lipid yield in chemostat cultures.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)939-949
JournalBioprocess and Biosystems Engineering
Volume34
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Keywords

  • solid-state fermentation
  • fatty-acid-composition
  • gamma-linolenic acid
  • mortierella-isabellina
  • mucor-circinelloides
  • biodiesel production
  • malic enzyme
  • carbon
  • growth
  • oils

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