Mixing Waters: A Cross Cultural Approach to Developing Guidelines for Fishers and Boaters in the Dhimurru Indigenous Protected Area

B. Verschuuren, M. Zylstra, B. Yunupingu, G.M. Verschoor

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/Letter to the editorAcademic

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article demonstrates the importance of indigenous ontologies in cross-cultural or ‘both ways’ coastal conservation management of the Dhimurru Indigenous Protected Area in north east Arnhem Land, Australia. In this action research, selected Yol¿u individuals identified concerns regarding recreational fishing and boating practices of non-Yol¿u. Yol¿u engaged in a discussion of the issues and the subsequent formulation of indigenous management responses. This led to the development of locally relevant guidelines for fishers and boaters with potentially broader applications in other Indigenous Protected Areas and beyond. We explore the ‘both ways’ approach adopted by the Dhimurru Aboriginal Corporation that guides collaboration between Yol¿u and non-Yol¿u. We illustrate how the approach facilitates indigenous ontologies to co-create conservation approaches together with contemporary conservation efforts informed by Western science. We further explore the disjunctures and synergies between the two and argue that these mix and can be compatible as part of the ‘both ways’ approach. In learning from this action research, we reflect on the process of cross-cultural learning and the role of researchers in the cross-cultural co-production of knowledge and the formulation of guidelines for fishers and
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-88
JournalPARKS: the International of Protected Areas and Conservation
Volume21
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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title = "Mixing Waters: A Cross Cultural Approach to Developing Guidelines for Fishers and Boaters in the Dhimurru Indigenous Protected Area",
abstract = "This article demonstrates the importance of indigenous ontologies in cross-cultural or ‘both ways’ coastal conservation management of the Dhimurru Indigenous Protected Area in north east Arnhem Land, Australia. In this action research, selected Yol¿u individuals identified concerns regarding recreational fishing and boating practices of non-Yol¿u. Yol¿u engaged in a discussion of the issues and the subsequent formulation of indigenous management responses. This led to the development of locally relevant guidelines for fishers and boaters with potentially broader applications in other Indigenous Protected Areas and beyond. We explore the ‘both ways’ approach adopted by the Dhimurru Aboriginal Corporation that guides collaboration between Yol¿u and non-Yol¿u. We illustrate how the approach facilitates indigenous ontologies to co-create conservation approaches together with contemporary conservation efforts informed by Western science. We further explore the disjunctures and synergies between the two and argue that these mix and can be compatible as part of the ‘both ways’ approach. In learning from this action research, we reflect on the process of cross-cultural learning and the role of researchers in the cross-cultural co-production of knowledge and the formulation of guidelines for fishers and",
author = "B. Verschuuren and M. Zylstra and B. Yunupingu and G.M. Verschoor",
year = "2014",
language = "English",
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pages = "73--88",
journal = "PARKS: the International of Protected Areas and Conservation",
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publisher = "IUCN - International Union for the Conservation of Nature",
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}

Mixing Waters: A Cross Cultural Approach to Developing Guidelines for Fishers and Boaters in the Dhimurru Indigenous Protected Area. / Verschuuren, B.; Zylstra, M.; Yunupingu, B.; Verschoor, G.M.

In: PARKS: the International of Protected Areas and Conservation, Vol. 21, No. 1, 2014, p. 73-88.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/Letter to the editorAcademic

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mixing Waters: A Cross Cultural Approach to Developing Guidelines for Fishers and Boaters in the Dhimurru Indigenous Protected Area

AU - Verschuuren, B.

AU - Zylstra, M.

AU - Yunupingu, B.

AU - Verschoor, G.M.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - This article demonstrates the importance of indigenous ontologies in cross-cultural or ‘both ways’ coastal conservation management of the Dhimurru Indigenous Protected Area in north east Arnhem Land, Australia. In this action research, selected Yol¿u individuals identified concerns regarding recreational fishing and boating practices of non-Yol¿u. Yol¿u engaged in a discussion of the issues and the subsequent formulation of indigenous management responses. This led to the development of locally relevant guidelines for fishers and boaters with potentially broader applications in other Indigenous Protected Areas and beyond. We explore the ‘both ways’ approach adopted by the Dhimurru Aboriginal Corporation that guides collaboration between Yol¿u and non-Yol¿u. We illustrate how the approach facilitates indigenous ontologies to co-create conservation approaches together with contemporary conservation efforts informed by Western science. We further explore the disjunctures and synergies between the two and argue that these mix and can be compatible as part of the ‘both ways’ approach. In learning from this action research, we reflect on the process of cross-cultural learning and the role of researchers in the cross-cultural co-production of knowledge and the formulation of guidelines for fishers and

AB - This article demonstrates the importance of indigenous ontologies in cross-cultural or ‘both ways’ coastal conservation management of the Dhimurru Indigenous Protected Area in north east Arnhem Land, Australia. In this action research, selected Yol¿u individuals identified concerns regarding recreational fishing and boating practices of non-Yol¿u. Yol¿u engaged in a discussion of the issues and the subsequent formulation of indigenous management responses. This led to the development of locally relevant guidelines for fishers and boaters with potentially broader applications in other Indigenous Protected Areas and beyond. We explore the ‘both ways’ approach adopted by the Dhimurru Aboriginal Corporation that guides collaboration between Yol¿u and non-Yol¿u. We illustrate how the approach facilitates indigenous ontologies to co-create conservation approaches together with contemporary conservation efforts informed by Western science. We further explore the disjunctures and synergies between the two and argue that these mix and can be compatible as part of the ‘both ways’ approach. In learning from this action research, we reflect on the process of cross-cultural learning and the role of researchers in the cross-cultural co-production of knowledge and the formulation of guidelines for fishers and

M3 - Comment/Letter to the editor

VL - 21

SP - 73

EP - 88

JO - PARKS: the International of Protected Areas and Conservation

JF - PARKS: the International of Protected Areas and Conservation

SN - 0960-233X

IS - 1

ER -