Minimizing the ecological footprint of food: closing yield and efficiency gaps simultaneously?

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Agriculture as a source of food has a substantial spillover that affects the Earth's ecosystems. This results in an ‘ecological footprint’ of food: negative environmental impacts per capita. The footprint depends on the dietary choice of types and amounts of food, on the non-consumed part of product flows and its fate (‘waste’ or ‘reused’), on transport and processing along the value chain, on the environmental impacts of production per unit area, and on the area needed per unit product. Yield gaps indicate inefficiency in this last aspect: resource-use efficiency gaps for water and nutrients indicate that environmental impacts per unit area are higher than desirable. Ecological intensification aimed at simultaneously closing these two gaps requires process-level understanding and system-level quantification of current efficiency of the use of land and other production factors at multiple scales (field, farm, landscape, regional and global economy). Contrary to common opinion, yield and efficiency gaps are partially independent in the empirical evidence. Synergy in gap closure is possible in many contexts where efforts are made but are not automatic. With Good Agricultural Practice (GAP), enforceable in world trade to control hidden subsidies, there is scope for incremental improvement towards food systems that are efficient at global, yet sustainable at local, scales.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)62-70
JournalCurrent Opinion in Environmental Sustainability
Volume8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

ecological footprint
food
environmental impact
efficiency
production factor
regional economy
global economy
value chain
agricultural practice
synergy
resource use
quantification
world trade
footprint
subsidy
farm
agriculture
water
economy
nutrient

Keywords

  • multifunctional landscapes
  • environmental services
  • ecosystem services
  • crop production
  • soil fertility
  • arable crops
  • systems
  • agriculture
  • management
  • intensification

Cite this

@article{cac5d677b450429b9c134d66713715d9,
title = "Minimizing the ecological footprint of food: closing yield and efficiency gaps simultaneously?",
abstract = "Agriculture as a source of food has a substantial spillover that affects the Earth's ecosystems. This results in an ‘ecological footprint’ of food: negative environmental impacts per capita. The footprint depends on the dietary choice of types and amounts of food, on the non-consumed part of product flows and its fate (‘waste’ or ‘reused’), on transport and processing along the value chain, on the environmental impacts of production per unit area, and on the area needed per unit product. Yield gaps indicate inefficiency in this last aspect: resource-use efficiency gaps for water and nutrients indicate that environmental impacts per unit area are higher than desirable. Ecological intensification aimed at simultaneously closing these two gaps requires process-level understanding and system-level quantification of current efficiency of the use of land and other production factors at multiple scales (field, farm, landscape, regional and global economy). Contrary to common opinion, yield and efficiency gaps are partially independent in the empirical evidence. Synergy in gap closure is possible in many contexts where efforts are made but are not automatic. With Good Agricultural Practice (GAP), enforceable in world trade to control hidden subsidies, there is scope for incremental improvement towards food systems that are efficient at global, yet sustainable at local, scales.",
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author = "{van Noordwijk}, M. and L. Brussaard",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1016/j.cosust.2014.08.008",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "62--70",
journal = "Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability",
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}

Minimizing the ecological footprint of food: closing yield and efficiency gaps simultaneously? / van Noordwijk, M.; Brussaard, L.

In: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Vol. 8, 2014, p. 62-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Minimizing the ecological footprint of food: closing yield and efficiency gaps simultaneously?

AU - van Noordwijk, M.

AU - Brussaard, L.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Agriculture as a source of food has a substantial spillover that affects the Earth's ecosystems. This results in an ‘ecological footprint’ of food: negative environmental impacts per capita. The footprint depends on the dietary choice of types and amounts of food, on the non-consumed part of product flows and its fate (‘waste’ or ‘reused’), on transport and processing along the value chain, on the environmental impacts of production per unit area, and on the area needed per unit product. Yield gaps indicate inefficiency in this last aspect: resource-use efficiency gaps for water and nutrients indicate that environmental impacts per unit area are higher than desirable. Ecological intensification aimed at simultaneously closing these two gaps requires process-level understanding and system-level quantification of current efficiency of the use of land and other production factors at multiple scales (field, farm, landscape, regional and global economy). Contrary to common opinion, yield and efficiency gaps are partially independent in the empirical evidence. Synergy in gap closure is possible in many contexts where efforts are made but are not automatic. With Good Agricultural Practice (GAP), enforceable in world trade to control hidden subsidies, there is scope for incremental improvement towards food systems that are efficient at global, yet sustainable at local, scales.

AB - Agriculture as a source of food has a substantial spillover that affects the Earth's ecosystems. This results in an ‘ecological footprint’ of food: negative environmental impacts per capita. The footprint depends on the dietary choice of types and amounts of food, on the non-consumed part of product flows and its fate (‘waste’ or ‘reused’), on transport and processing along the value chain, on the environmental impacts of production per unit area, and on the area needed per unit product. Yield gaps indicate inefficiency in this last aspect: resource-use efficiency gaps for water and nutrients indicate that environmental impacts per unit area are higher than desirable. Ecological intensification aimed at simultaneously closing these two gaps requires process-level understanding and system-level quantification of current efficiency of the use of land and other production factors at multiple scales (field, farm, landscape, regional and global economy). Contrary to common opinion, yield and efficiency gaps are partially independent in the empirical evidence. Synergy in gap closure is possible in many contexts where efforts are made but are not automatic. With Good Agricultural Practice (GAP), enforceable in world trade to control hidden subsidies, there is scope for incremental improvement towards food systems that are efficient at global, yet sustainable at local, scales.

KW - multifunctional landscapes

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KW - ecosystem services

KW - crop production

KW - soil fertility

KW - arable crops

KW - systems

KW - agriculture

KW - management

KW - intensification

U2 - 10.1016/j.cosust.2014.08.008

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JO - Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability

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SN - 1877-3435

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