Microstructure, rheology and demixing in emulsions flocculated by polysaccharides

T.B.J. Blijdenstein

Research output: Thesisinternal PhD, WU

Abstract

keywords: Emulsion, b-lactoglobulin, polysaccharides, salt, sucrose, depletion, bridging, percolation, microstructure, micro-rheology, rheology, demixing, creaming, network compression. Abstract In this thesis, a study is presented on gravity-induced demixing behaviour of oil-in-water emulsions, stabilised by b-lactoglobulin and flocculated by various polysaccharides. Flocculation by polysaccharides mainly results in formation of emulsion droplet networks and can proceed via depletion and via bridging. Structural and rheological properties of these different networks were investigated and compared on a micro-and macroscopic level. These properties were related to the demixing behaviour of the emulsions. For emulsion droplet networks, gravity-induced compression of the network leads to separation of a serum layer. For depletion-induced networks, the initial rate of demixing by network compression is usually low and at high polysaccharide concentrations, usually a delay-time is observed before substantial demixing occurs. This delay-time scales with the permeability of the network, the viscosity and the density difference between oil and water. Once demixing has started, the network quickly collapses until the emulsion droplets are packed rather closely together. In bridging-flocculated emulsions, the initial demixing rate is higher, but more water was retained at longer times. The effects of protein, sugar and salts on demixing of depletion-flocculated networks were investigated as well. Protein affected the rate of flocculation and counteracted network formation. Sucrose affected the demixing rate via the viscosity and density of the aqueous phase, but it did not affect the droplet-droplet interactions. Salt affected the electrostatic droplet-droplet interactions. As a result, depletion-flocculation by dextran was inhibited at low salt concentrations. Addition of Ca2+ ions led to a decrease in repulsion between the protein layers, resulting in stronger droplet-droplet bonds, reinforcing a droplet network and retarding network compression.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • Wageningen University
Supervisors/Advisors
  • van der Linden, Erik, Promotor
  • van Aken, G.A., Co-promotor, External person
  • van Vliet, Ton, Co-promotor
Award date20 Feb 2004
Place of PublicationWageningen
Publisher
Print ISBNs9789058089588
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Fingerprint

Emulsions
Rheology
Polysaccharides
Microstructure
Flocculation
Salts
Lactoglobulins
Sucrose
Water
Time delay
Gravitation
Oils
Viscosity
Proteins
Dextrans
Sugars
Electrostatics
Ions

Keywords

  • emulsions
  • flocculation
  • polysaccharides
  • rheology
  • structure

Cite this

Blijdenstein, T.B.J.. / Microstructure, rheology and demixing in emulsions flocculated by polysaccharides. Wageningen : S.n., 2004. 121 p.
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title = "Microstructure, rheology and demixing in emulsions flocculated by polysaccharides",
abstract = "keywords: Emulsion, b-lactoglobulin, polysaccharides, salt, sucrose, depletion, bridging, percolation, microstructure, micro-rheology, rheology, demixing, creaming, network compression. Abstract In this thesis, a study is presented on gravity-induced demixing behaviour of oil-in-water emulsions, stabilised by b-lactoglobulin and flocculated by various polysaccharides. Flocculation by polysaccharides mainly results in formation of emulsion droplet networks and can proceed via depletion and via bridging. Structural and rheological properties of these different networks were investigated and compared on a micro-and macroscopic level. These properties were related to the demixing behaviour of the emulsions. For emulsion droplet networks, gravity-induced compression of the network leads to separation of a serum layer. For depletion-induced networks, the initial rate of demixing by network compression is usually low and at high polysaccharide concentrations, usually a delay-time is observed before substantial demixing occurs. This delay-time scales with the permeability of the network, the viscosity and the density difference between oil and water. Once demixing has started, the network quickly collapses until the emulsion droplets are packed rather closely together. In bridging-flocculated emulsions, the initial demixing rate is higher, but more water was retained at longer times. The effects of protein, sugar and salts on demixing of depletion-flocculated networks were investigated as well. Protein affected the rate of flocculation and counteracted network formation. Sucrose affected the demixing rate via the viscosity and density of the aqueous phase, but it did not affect the droplet-droplet interactions. Salt affected the electrostatic droplet-droplet interactions. As a result, depletion-flocculation by dextran was inhibited at low salt concentrations. Addition of Ca2+ ions led to a decrease in repulsion between the protein layers, resulting in stronger droplet-droplet bonds, reinforcing a droplet network and retarding network compression.",
keywords = "emulsies, uitvlokking, polysacchariden, reologie, structuur, emulsions, flocculation, polysaccharides, rheology, structure",
author = "T.B.J. Blijdenstein",
note = "WU thesis 3542",
year = "2004",
language = "English",
isbn = "9789058089588",
publisher = "S.n.",
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Blijdenstein, TBJ 2004, 'Microstructure, rheology and demixing in emulsions flocculated by polysaccharides', Doctor of Philosophy, Wageningen University, Wageningen.

Microstructure, rheology and demixing in emulsions flocculated by polysaccharides. / Blijdenstein, T.B.J.

Wageningen : S.n., 2004. 121 p.

Research output: Thesisinternal PhD, WU

TY - THES

T1 - Microstructure, rheology and demixing in emulsions flocculated by polysaccharides

AU - Blijdenstein, T.B.J.

N1 - WU thesis 3542

PY - 2004

Y1 - 2004

N2 - keywords: Emulsion, b-lactoglobulin, polysaccharides, salt, sucrose, depletion, bridging, percolation, microstructure, micro-rheology, rheology, demixing, creaming, network compression. Abstract In this thesis, a study is presented on gravity-induced demixing behaviour of oil-in-water emulsions, stabilised by b-lactoglobulin and flocculated by various polysaccharides. Flocculation by polysaccharides mainly results in formation of emulsion droplet networks and can proceed via depletion and via bridging. Structural and rheological properties of these different networks were investigated and compared on a micro-and macroscopic level. These properties were related to the demixing behaviour of the emulsions. For emulsion droplet networks, gravity-induced compression of the network leads to separation of a serum layer. For depletion-induced networks, the initial rate of demixing by network compression is usually low and at high polysaccharide concentrations, usually a delay-time is observed before substantial demixing occurs. This delay-time scales with the permeability of the network, the viscosity and the density difference between oil and water. Once demixing has started, the network quickly collapses until the emulsion droplets are packed rather closely together. In bridging-flocculated emulsions, the initial demixing rate is higher, but more water was retained at longer times. The effects of protein, sugar and salts on demixing of depletion-flocculated networks were investigated as well. Protein affected the rate of flocculation and counteracted network formation. Sucrose affected the demixing rate via the viscosity and density of the aqueous phase, but it did not affect the droplet-droplet interactions. Salt affected the electrostatic droplet-droplet interactions. As a result, depletion-flocculation by dextran was inhibited at low salt concentrations. Addition of Ca2+ ions led to a decrease in repulsion between the protein layers, resulting in stronger droplet-droplet bonds, reinforcing a droplet network and retarding network compression.

AB - keywords: Emulsion, b-lactoglobulin, polysaccharides, salt, sucrose, depletion, bridging, percolation, microstructure, micro-rheology, rheology, demixing, creaming, network compression. Abstract In this thesis, a study is presented on gravity-induced demixing behaviour of oil-in-water emulsions, stabilised by b-lactoglobulin and flocculated by various polysaccharides. Flocculation by polysaccharides mainly results in formation of emulsion droplet networks and can proceed via depletion and via bridging. Structural and rheological properties of these different networks were investigated and compared on a micro-and macroscopic level. These properties were related to the demixing behaviour of the emulsions. For emulsion droplet networks, gravity-induced compression of the network leads to separation of a serum layer. For depletion-induced networks, the initial rate of demixing by network compression is usually low and at high polysaccharide concentrations, usually a delay-time is observed before substantial demixing occurs. This delay-time scales with the permeability of the network, the viscosity and the density difference between oil and water. Once demixing has started, the network quickly collapses until the emulsion droplets are packed rather closely together. In bridging-flocculated emulsions, the initial demixing rate is higher, but more water was retained at longer times. The effects of protein, sugar and salts on demixing of depletion-flocculated networks were investigated as well. Protein affected the rate of flocculation and counteracted network formation. Sucrose affected the demixing rate via the viscosity and density of the aqueous phase, but it did not affect the droplet-droplet interactions. Salt affected the electrostatic droplet-droplet interactions. As a result, depletion-flocculation by dextran was inhibited at low salt concentrations. Addition of Ca2+ ions led to a decrease in repulsion between the protein layers, resulting in stronger droplet-droplet bonds, reinforcing a droplet network and retarding network compression.

KW - emulsies

KW - uitvlokking

KW - polysacchariden

KW - reologie

KW - structuur

KW - emulsions

KW - flocculation

KW - polysaccharides

KW - rheology

KW - structure

M3 - internal PhD, WU

SN - 9789058089588

PB - S.n.

CY - Wageningen

ER -