Microsatellite DNA marker inheritance indicates preferential pairing between two highly homologous genomes in polyploid and hemisexual dogroses, Rosa L. sect. Caninae DC

H. Nybom, D. Esselink, G. Werlemarkt, B.J. Vosman

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    85 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    According to previous cytological evidence, the hemisexual dog-rose species, Rosa sect. Caninae, transmit only seven chromosomes (derived from seven bivalents) through their pollen grains, whereas egg cells contain 21, 28 or 35 chromosomes (derived from seven bivalents and 14, 21 or 28 univalents) depending on ploidy level. Two sets of reciprocal pairwise interspecific crosses involving the pentaploid species pair R. dumalis and R. rubiginosa, and the pentaploid/tetraploid species pair R. sherardii and R. villosa, were analysed for 13 and 12 microsatellite DNA loci, respectively. Single loci were represented by a maximum of three simultaneously occurring alleles in R. villosa, and four alleles in the other three parental plants. In the experimentally derived offspring, the theoretical maximum of five alleles was found for only one locus in the pentaploid progenies. Microsatellite DNA allele composition was identical with that of the maternal parent in 10 offspring plants, which were probably derived through apomixis. Almost all microsatellite DNA alleles were shared with the maternal parent also in the remaining offspring, but 1-4 alleles shared only with the paternal parent, indicating sexual seed formation. Analysis of quantitative peak differences allowed a tentative estimation of allelic configuration in the individual plants, and suggested that bivalent formation preferentially takes place between chromosomes that consistently share the same microsatellite alleles and therefore appear to be highly homologous. Moreover, alleles that were shared between the species in each cross combination comparatively often appear to reside on the bivalent-forming chromosomes, whereas species-specific alleles instead occur comparatively often on the univalent-forming chromosomes and are therefore inherited through the maternal parent only. Recombination then takes place between very similar genomes also in interspecific crosses, resulting in a reproduction system that is essentially a mixture between apomixis and selfing.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)139-150
    JournalHeredity
    Volume92
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2004

    Keywords

    • cultivar identification
    • skewed distribution
    • ssr markers
    • plants
    • drawings
    • rapd
    • hybridization
    • dogroses
    • apomixis
    • crosses

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