Members of the ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) family act as pro‐viral factor for tomato spotted wilt orthotospovirus infectivity in Nicotiana benthamiana

Tieme A. Helderman, Laurens Deurhof, André Bertran, Manon M.S. Richard, Richard Kormelink, Marcel Prins, Matthieu H.A.J. Joosten, Harrold A. van den Burg*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

To identify host factors for tomato spotted wilt orthotospovirus (TSWV), a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) screen using tobacco rattle virus (TRV) was performed on Nicotiana benthamiana for TSWV susceptibility. To rule out any negative effect on the plants’ performance due to a double viral infection, the method was optimized to allow screening of hundreds of clones in a standardized fashion. To normalize the results obtained in and between experiments, a set of controls was developed to evaluate in a consist manner both VIGS efficacy and the level of TSWV resistance. Using this method, 4532 random clones of an N. benthamiana cDNA library were tested, resulting in five TRV clones that provided nearly complete resistance against TSWV. Here we report on one of these clones, of which the insert targets a small gene family coding for the ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) that is part of the 40S ribosomal subunit. This RPS6 family is represented by three gene clades in the genome of Solanaceae family members, which were jointly important for TSWV susceptibility. Interestingly, RPS6 is a known host factor implicated in the replication of different plant RNA viruses, including the negative-stranded TSWV and the positive-stranded potato virus X.
Original languageEnglish
JournalMolecular Plant Pathology
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 16 Dec 2021

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