Mechanical, dynamic-mechanical and thermal properties of soy protein-based thermoplastics with potential biomedical applications

C.A. Vaz, J.F. Mano, M. Fossen, R.F. van Tuil, L.A. de Graaf, R.L. Reis, A.A. Cunha

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    35 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In this study the tensile and the dynamic-mechanical behavior of injection-molded samples of various soy protein thermoplastic compounds were evaluated as a function of the amount of glycerol, type and amount of ceramic reinforcement, and eventual incorporation of coupling agents. The incorporation of glycerol into a soy-based matrix resulted in its plasticization, as confirmed by the drop in stiffness (storage and elastic modulus) above 20degreesC and a decrease in the protein glass transition temperature. Differential scanning calorimetric thermograms proved the occurrence of conformational changes in the soy protein during processing. Furthermore, the developed soy protein-based thermoplastics showed a thermal stability up to 100degreesC, as confirmed by thermogravimetric analysis, The reinforcement of the soy protein matrix with a ceramic filler (tricalcium phosphate) was shown to be effective for amounts above 10 /w. The introduction of an amino-coupling agent led to a plasticizing effect, detected in the mechanical and dynamic-mechanical properties of the resulting materials. The results also show a good qualitative agreement between the properties obtained from quasi-static and dynamic experiments. The materials present a range of properties that might allow for their use eventually in a range of biomedical applications.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)33-46
    JournalJournal of macromolecular science. Part B, Physics
    Volume41
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2002

    Keywords

    • plastics
    • proteins
    • molding
    • testing of materials
    • biological materials

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