Materiele cultuur in de Krimpenerwaard in de zeventiende en achttiende eeuw : ontwikkeling en diversiteit

J.A. Kamermans

    Research output: Thesisinternal PhD, WUAcademic

    Abstract

    In recent years, much attention has been given to using the history of material culture to trace profound changes in economic, social and cultural conditions. A lot of this research is based on the availability of large numbers of probate inventories in western archives, their comparability, and the growing means of exploring them with the assistance of computers.

    To get an idea about developments in the countryside of Holland, a leading economic region in early modern Europe, the area known as the Krimpenerwaard was chosen. This region lies between the cities of Rotterdam, Gouda and Schoonhoven, and is bordered by the rivers Lek and Hollandse IJssel. As well as milk and dairy products, salmon fishing and brick making were important activities too. A selection of probate inventories (1630-1670 and 1700-1795), representative of farmers, middle-classes and notables of different wealth-classes showed a striking increase in the average number of different objects possessed by households until the middle of the eighteenth century.

    It became clear that farmers consistently owned fewer goods than the middle-classes, even when their wealth was comparable. This did not mean that farmers completely lacked innovation; They took to drinking tea and coffee, for example. However, apart from these exotic introductions, most changes can be characterized as a growing concern for domesticity (decoration of the house, heating and lighting, cleaning, storing and other home comforts.

    Published as doctoral thesis, Agricultural University Wageningen (ISBN 90-5808-014-5); by Verloren Publishers Hilversum (ISBN 90-6550-062-6); and as A.A.G. Bijdragen 39 (ISSN 0511-0726); 404 pages, 150 tables, 18 figures, 2 maps, 21 photo's, 6 appendices, 414 references and an English summary.

    Original languageDutch
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Awarding Institution
    Supervisors/Advisors
    • van der Woude, A.M., Promotor
    • Schuurman, A.J., Promotor, External person
    Award date28 Jun 1999
    Place of PublicationWageningen
    Publisher
    Print ISBNs9789058080141
    Publication statusPublished - 1999

    Keywords

    • clothing
    • furniture
    • food
    • history
    • culture
    • dwellings
    • homes
    • textiles
    • netherlands
    • agriculture
    • books
    • cultural history
    • zuid-holland
    • krimpenerwaard

    Cite this

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    title = "Materiele cultuur in de Krimpenerwaard in de zeventiende en achttiende eeuw : ontwikkeling en diversiteit",
    abstract = "In recent years, much attention has been given to using the history of material culture to trace profound changes in economic, social and cultural conditions. A lot of this research is based on the availability of large numbers of probate inventories in western archives, their comparability, and the growing means of exploring them with the assistance of computers.To get an idea about developments in the countryside of Holland, a leading economic region in early modern Europe, the area known as the Krimpenerwaard was chosen. This region lies between the cities of Rotterdam, Gouda and Schoonhoven, and is bordered by the rivers Lek and Hollandse IJssel. As well as milk and dairy products, salmon fishing and brick making were important activities too. A selection of probate inventories (1630-1670 and 1700-1795), representative of farmers, middle-classes and notables of different wealth-classes showed a striking increase in the average number of different objects possessed by households until the middle of the eighteenth century.It became clear that farmers consistently owned fewer goods than the middle-classes, even when their wealth was comparable. This did not mean that farmers completely lacked innovation; They took to drinking tea and coffee, for example. However, apart from these exotic introductions, most changes can be characterized as a growing concern for domesticity (decoration of the house, heating and lighting, cleaning, storing and other home comforts.Published as doctoral thesis, Agricultural University Wageningen (ISBN 90-5808-014-5); by Verloren Publishers Hilversum (ISBN 90-6550-062-6); and as A.A.G. Bijdragen 39 (ISSN 0511-0726); 404 pages, 150 tables, 18 figures, 2 maps, 21 photo's, 6 appendices, 414 references and an English summary.",
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    author = "J.A. Kamermans",
    note = "WU thesis 2644 Proefschrift Wageningen",
    year = "1999",
    language = "Dutch",
    isbn = "9789058080141",
    publisher = "Landbouwuniversiteit",

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    Materiele cultuur in de Krimpenerwaard in de zeventiende en achttiende eeuw : ontwikkeling en diversiteit. / Kamermans, J.A.

    Wageningen : Landbouwuniversiteit, 1999. 401 p.

    Research output: Thesisinternal PhD, WUAcademic

    TY - THES

    T1 - Materiele cultuur in de Krimpenerwaard in de zeventiende en achttiende eeuw : ontwikkeling en diversiteit

    AU - Kamermans, J.A.

    N1 - WU thesis 2644 Proefschrift Wageningen

    PY - 1999

    Y1 - 1999

    N2 - In recent years, much attention has been given to using the history of material culture to trace profound changes in economic, social and cultural conditions. A lot of this research is based on the availability of large numbers of probate inventories in western archives, their comparability, and the growing means of exploring them with the assistance of computers.To get an idea about developments in the countryside of Holland, a leading economic region in early modern Europe, the area known as the Krimpenerwaard was chosen. This region lies between the cities of Rotterdam, Gouda and Schoonhoven, and is bordered by the rivers Lek and Hollandse IJssel. As well as milk and dairy products, salmon fishing and brick making were important activities too. A selection of probate inventories (1630-1670 and 1700-1795), representative of farmers, middle-classes and notables of different wealth-classes showed a striking increase in the average number of different objects possessed by households until the middle of the eighteenth century.It became clear that farmers consistently owned fewer goods than the middle-classes, even when their wealth was comparable. This did not mean that farmers completely lacked innovation; They took to drinking tea and coffee, for example. However, apart from these exotic introductions, most changes can be characterized as a growing concern for domesticity (decoration of the house, heating and lighting, cleaning, storing and other home comforts.Published as doctoral thesis, Agricultural University Wageningen (ISBN 90-5808-014-5); by Verloren Publishers Hilversum (ISBN 90-6550-062-6); and as A.A.G. Bijdragen 39 (ISSN 0511-0726); 404 pages, 150 tables, 18 figures, 2 maps, 21 photo's, 6 appendices, 414 references and an English summary.

    AB - In recent years, much attention has been given to using the history of material culture to trace profound changes in economic, social and cultural conditions. A lot of this research is based on the availability of large numbers of probate inventories in western archives, their comparability, and the growing means of exploring them with the assistance of computers.To get an idea about developments in the countryside of Holland, a leading economic region in early modern Europe, the area known as the Krimpenerwaard was chosen. This region lies between the cities of Rotterdam, Gouda and Schoonhoven, and is bordered by the rivers Lek and Hollandse IJssel. As well as milk and dairy products, salmon fishing and brick making were important activities too. A selection of probate inventories (1630-1670 and 1700-1795), representative of farmers, middle-classes and notables of different wealth-classes showed a striking increase in the average number of different objects possessed by households until the middle of the eighteenth century.It became clear that farmers consistently owned fewer goods than the middle-classes, even when their wealth was comparable. This did not mean that farmers completely lacked innovation; They took to drinking tea and coffee, for example. However, apart from these exotic introductions, most changes can be characterized as a growing concern for domesticity (decoration of the house, heating and lighting, cleaning, storing and other home comforts.Published as doctoral thesis, Agricultural University Wageningen (ISBN 90-5808-014-5); by Verloren Publishers Hilversum (ISBN 90-6550-062-6); and as A.A.G. Bijdragen 39 (ISSN 0511-0726); 404 pages, 150 tables, 18 figures, 2 maps, 21 photo's, 6 appendices, 414 references and an English summary.

    KW - kleding

    KW - meubilair

    KW - voedsel

    KW - geschiedenis

    KW - cultuur

    KW - woningen

    KW - huizen

    KW - textiel

    KW - nederland

    KW - landbouw

    KW - boeken

    KW - cultuurgeschiedenis

    KW - zuid-holland

    KW - krimpenerwaard

    KW - clothing

    KW - furniture

    KW - food

    KW - history

    KW - culture

    KW - dwellings

    KW - homes

    KW - textiles

    KW - netherlands

    KW - agriculture

    KW - books

    KW - cultural history

    KW - zuid-holland

    KW - krimpenerwaard

    M3 - internal PhD, WU

    SN - 9789058080141

    PB - Landbouwuniversiteit

    CY - Wageningen

    ER -