Marital status and living situation during a 5-year period are associated with a subsequent 10-year cognitive decline in older men: The FINE study

B.M. van Gelder, M. Tijhuis, S. Kalmijn, S. Giampaoli, A. Nissinen, D. Kromhout

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

We investigate the association between marital status and living situation (over 5 years) on 10-year subsequent cognitive decline. The study population consisted of 1,042 men aged 70-89 years in 1990, who participated in the longitudinal Finland, Italy, the Netherlands Elderly (known as FINE) Study. We measured cognition by using the Mini-Mental State Examination, and we assessed marital status (married vs unmarried) and living situation (living with others vs living alone) with a standardized questionnaire. We performed repeated measurement analyses and made adjustments for age, education, country, smoking, alcohol, chronic diseases, marital status or living situation, and baseline cognition. Men who lost a partner, who were unmarried, who started to live alone, or who lived alone during the 5-year period had at least a two times stronger subsequent cognitive decline compared with men who were married or who lived with someone in those years.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)P213-P219
JournalJournals of Gerontology. Series B: Psychological Sciences & Social Sciences
Volume61
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Keywords

  • social integration
  • risk-factors
  • elderly-men
  • alzheimers-disease
  • leisure activities
  • physical-activity
  • dementia
  • health
  • performance
  • prevalence

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