Managing wild minds

From control by numbers to a multinatural approach in wild boar management in the Veluwe, the Netherlands

Susan Boonman-Berson*, Clemens Driessen, Esther Turnhout

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Current wildlife management practices rely largely on quantitative data to legitimise decisions, manage human–wildlife conflicts and control wildlife populations. This paper draws attention to the affective relationships between humans and animals inevitably formed in the practice of producing these data. Based on fieldwork that explores wild boar management in the Veluwe, the Netherlands, we demonstrate the significance of these affective encounters. Specifically, we develop an understanding of mindedness that draws on processes of affective learning in wildlife management practices. To understand this mindedness and how it emerges in wild boar management practices, we use the concepts of affect, attunement and animal subjectivities. First, we show how the numero-politics involved in wildlife management presumes animal minds to be static and generically defined by species, and their presence and behaviour to be context independent. Subsequently, we describe the entanglements of humans, wild animals and the landscape, aiming to produce an appreciation of the mutuality that is involved in knowing and conserving wildlife. This, we propose, helps to demonstrate how various – individual or collective – forms of human and non-human mindedness are implicated in management practices but remain invisible and underappreciated in formal accounts. We conclude by explicating a multinatural approach to the management of wildlife that explicitly builds on an acknowledgment of mindedness as a feature of individuals, collectives and landscapes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2-15
JournalTransactions of the Institute of British Geographers
Volume44
Issue number1
Early online date16 Sep 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2019

Fingerprint

wildlife management
management practice
Netherlands
management
animal
fieldwork
politics
learning
subjectivity
wildlife

Keywords

  • affective relations
  • human–wildlife relations
  • mindedness
  • Veluwe
  • wild boar
  • wildlife management

Cite this

@article{9d4748382d264cfb8bd1000431b3a964,
title = "Managing wild minds: From control by numbers to a multinatural approach in wild boar management in the Veluwe, the Netherlands",
abstract = "Current wildlife management practices rely largely on quantitative data to legitimise decisions, manage human–wildlife conflicts and control wildlife populations. This paper draws attention to the affective relationships between humans and animals inevitably formed in the practice of producing these data. Based on fieldwork that explores wild boar management in the Veluwe, the Netherlands, we demonstrate the significance of these affective encounters. Specifically, we develop an understanding of mindedness that draws on processes of affective learning in wildlife management practices. To understand this mindedness and how it emerges in wild boar management practices, we use the concepts of affect, attunement and animal subjectivities. First, we show how the numero-politics involved in wildlife management presumes animal minds to be static and generically defined by species, and their presence and behaviour to be context independent. Subsequently, we describe the entanglements of humans, wild animals and the landscape, aiming to produce an appreciation of the mutuality that is involved in knowing and conserving wildlife. This, we propose, helps to demonstrate how various – individual or collective – forms of human and non-human mindedness are implicated in management practices but remain invisible and underappreciated in formal accounts. We conclude by explicating a multinatural approach to the management of wildlife that explicitly builds on an acknowledgment of mindedness as a feature of individuals, collectives and landscapes.",
keywords = "affective relations, human–wildlife relations, mindedness, Veluwe, wild boar, wildlife management",
author = "Susan Boonman-Berson and Clemens Driessen and Esther Turnhout",
year = "2019",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1111/tran.12269",
language = "English",
volume = "44",
pages = "2--15",
journal = "Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers",
issn = "0020-2754",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "1",

}

Managing wild minds : From control by numbers to a multinatural approach in wild boar management in the Veluwe, the Netherlands. / Boonman-Berson, Susan; Driessen, Clemens; Turnhout, Esther.

In: Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, Vol. 44, No. 1, 03.2019, p. 2-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Managing wild minds

T2 - From control by numbers to a multinatural approach in wild boar management in the Veluwe, the Netherlands

AU - Boonman-Berson, Susan

AU - Driessen, Clemens

AU - Turnhout, Esther

PY - 2019/3

Y1 - 2019/3

N2 - Current wildlife management practices rely largely on quantitative data to legitimise decisions, manage human–wildlife conflicts and control wildlife populations. This paper draws attention to the affective relationships between humans and animals inevitably formed in the practice of producing these data. Based on fieldwork that explores wild boar management in the Veluwe, the Netherlands, we demonstrate the significance of these affective encounters. Specifically, we develop an understanding of mindedness that draws on processes of affective learning in wildlife management practices. To understand this mindedness and how it emerges in wild boar management practices, we use the concepts of affect, attunement and animal subjectivities. First, we show how the numero-politics involved in wildlife management presumes animal minds to be static and generically defined by species, and their presence and behaviour to be context independent. Subsequently, we describe the entanglements of humans, wild animals and the landscape, aiming to produce an appreciation of the mutuality that is involved in knowing and conserving wildlife. This, we propose, helps to demonstrate how various – individual or collective – forms of human and non-human mindedness are implicated in management practices but remain invisible and underappreciated in formal accounts. We conclude by explicating a multinatural approach to the management of wildlife that explicitly builds on an acknowledgment of mindedness as a feature of individuals, collectives and landscapes.

AB - Current wildlife management practices rely largely on quantitative data to legitimise decisions, manage human–wildlife conflicts and control wildlife populations. This paper draws attention to the affective relationships between humans and animals inevitably formed in the practice of producing these data. Based on fieldwork that explores wild boar management in the Veluwe, the Netherlands, we demonstrate the significance of these affective encounters. Specifically, we develop an understanding of mindedness that draws on processes of affective learning in wildlife management practices. To understand this mindedness and how it emerges in wild boar management practices, we use the concepts of affect, attunement and animal subjectivities. First, we show how the numero-politics involved in wildlife management presumes animal minds to be static and generically defined by species, and their presence and behaviour to be context independent. Subsequently, we describe the entanglements of humans, wild animals and the landscape, aiming to produce an appreciation of the mutuality that is involved in knowing and conserving wildlife. This, we propose, helps to demonstrate how various – individual or collective – forms of human and non-human mindedness are implicated in management practices but remain invisible and underappreciated in formal accounts. We conclude by explicating a multinatural approach to the management of wildlife that explicitly builds on an acknowledgment of mindedness as a feature of individuals, collectives and landscapes.

KW - affective relations

KW - human–wildlife relations

KW - mindedness

KW - Veluwe

KW - wild boar

KW - wildlife management

U2 - 10.1111/tran.12269

DO - 10.1111/tran.12269

M3 - Article

VL - 44

SP - 2

EP - 15

JO - Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers

JF - Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers

SN - 0020-2754

IS - 1

ER -