Linking aboveground and belowground inducible plant resistance

T.M. Bezemer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademic

Abstract

Induced resistance of plants against pests and diseases via plant defense responses is well documented and can occur aboveground, in the leaves, and belowground in the roots. A number of recent studies have shown that soil-borne pests can also induce plant resistance aboveground and vice versa. Since plants are frequently exposed to aboveground and belowground pests simultaneously, interactions between induced plant defense responses in the foliage and in the roots can have major implications for induced resistance. On the one hand, induction in one plant part may result in systemically induced resistance in the other part. On the other hand, simultaneously occurring aboveground and belowground induced plant defenses may interfere, for example, when the activities of root feeders alter the effectiveness of induced resistance against foliar herbivores. Such aboveground-belowground interactions can also potentially influence tritrophic interactions between plants, herbivores and their natural enemies such as parasitoids or predators
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the IOBC Working Group on Induced Resistance in Plants Against Insects and Diseases, Heraklion, Crete, Greece, 27-29 April 2006
EditorsA. Schmitt, N. Birch, M. Dicke, B. Mach-Mani
Pages65-71
Volume44
Publication statusPublished - 2009
EventIOBC Working Group on Induced Resistance in Plants Against Insects and Diseases, Heraklion, Crete, Greece -
Duration: 27 Apr 200629 Apr 2006

Conference

ConferenceIOBC Working Group on Induced Resistance in Plants Against Insects and Diseases, Heraklion, Crete, Greece
Period27/04/0629/04/06

Fingerprint

induced resistance
herbivores
tritrophic interactions
pests
plant pests
plant diseases and disorders
natural enemies
plant anatomy
parasitoids
leaves
predators
soil

Cite this

Bezemer, T. M. (2009). Linking aboveground and belowground inducible plant resistance. In A. Schmitt, N. Birch, M. Dicke, & B. Mach-Mani (Eds.), Proceedings of the IOBC Working Group on Induced Resistance in Plants Against Insects and Diseases, Heraklion, Crete, Greece, 27-29 April 2006 (Vol. 44, pp. 65-71)
Bezemer, T.M. / Linking aboveground and belowground inducible plant resistance. Proceedings of the IOBC Working Group on Induced Resistance in Plants Against Insects and Diseases, Heraklion, Crete, Greece, 27-29 April 2006. editor / A. Schmitt ; N. Birch ; M. Dicke ; B. Mach-Mani. Vol. 44 2009. pp. 65-71
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abstract = "Induced resistance of plants against pests and diseases via plant defense responses is well documented and can occur aboveground, in the leaves, and belowground in the roots. A number of recent studies have shown that soil-borne pests can also induce plant resistance aboveground and vice versa. Since plants are frequently exposed to aboveground and belowground pests simultaneously, interactions between induced plant defense responses in the foliage and in the roots can have major implications for induced resistance. On the one hand, induction in one plant part may result in systemically induced resistance in the other part. On the other hand, simultaneously occurring aboveground and belowground induced plant defenses may interfere, for example, when the activities of root feeders alter the effectiveness of induced resistance against foliar herbivores. Such aboveground-belowground interactions can also potentially influence tritrophic interactions between plants, herbivores and their natural enemies such as parasitoids or predators",
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Bezemer, TM 2009, Linking aboveground and belowground inducible plant resistance. in A Schmitt, N Birch, M Dicke & B Mach-Mani (eds), Proceedings of the IOBC Working Group on Induced Resistance in Plants Against Insects and Diseases, Heraklion, Crete, Greece, 27-29 April 2006. vol. 44, pp. 65-71, IOBC Working Group on Induced Resistance in Plants Against Insects and Diseases, Heraklion, Crete, Greece, 27/04/06.

Linking aboveground and belowground inducible plant resistance. / Bezemer, T.M.

Proceedings of the IOBC Working Group on Induced Resistance in Plants Against Insects and Diseases, Heraklion, Crete, Greece, 27-29 April 2006. ed. / A. Schmitt; N. Birch; M. Dicke; B. Mach-Mani. Vol. 44 2009. p. 65-71.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademic

TY - GEN

T1 - Linking aboveground and belowground inducible plant resistance

AU - Bezemer, T.M.

PY - 2009

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N2 - Induced resistance of plants against pests and diseases via plant defense responses is well documented and can occur aboveground, in the leaves, and belowground in the roots. A number of recent studies have shown that soil-borne pests can also induce plant resistance aboveground and vice versa. Since plants are frequently exposed to aboveground and belowground pests simultaneously, interactions between induced plant defense responses in the foliage and in the roots can have major implications for induced resistance. On the one hand, induction in one plant part may result in systemically induced resistance in the other part. On the other hand, simultaneously occurring aboveground and belowground induced plant defenses may interfere, for example, when the activities of root feeders alter the effectiveness of induced resistance against foliar herbivores. Such aboveground-belowground interactions can also potentially influence tritrophic interactions between plants, herbivores and their natural enemies such as parasitoids or predators

AB - Induced resistance of plants against pests and diseases via plant defense responses is well documented and can occur aboveground, in the leaves, and belowground in the roots. A number of recent studies have shown that soil-borne pests can also induce plant resistance aboveground and vice versa. Since plants are frequently exposed to aboveground and belowground pests simultaneously, interactions between induced plant defense responses in the foliage and in the roots can have major implications for induced resistance. On the one hand, induction in one plant part may result in systemically induced resistance in the other part. On the other hand, simultaneously occurring aboveground and belowground induced plant defenses may interfere, for example, when the activities of root feeders alter the effectiveness of induced resistance against foliar herbivores. Such aboveground-belowground interactions can also potentially influence tritrophic interactions between plants, herbivores and their natural enemies such as parasitoids or predators

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BT - Proceedings of the IOBC Working Group on Induced Resistance in Plants Against Insects and Diseases, Heraklion, Crete, Greece, 27-29 April 2006

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Bezemer TM. Linking aboveground and belowground inducible plant resistance. In Schmitt A, Birch N, Dicke M, Mach-Mani B, editors, Proceedings of the IOBC Working Group on Induced Resistance in Plants Against Insects and Diseases, Heraklion, Crete, Greece, 27-29 April 2006. Vol. 44. 2009. p. 65-71