Lignin degradation by Agaricus bisporus accounts for a 30% increase in bioavailable holocellulose during cultivation on compost

R. Ten Have, H. Wijngaard, N.A.E. Aries - Kronenburg, G. Straatsma, P.J. Schaap

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The common mushroom Agaricus bisporus is a non-white rot saphrophytic fungus that can degrade lignin to free and utilize holocellulose embedded in fermented straw as present in compost. A new method is described to estimate the actual amount of bioavailable holocellulose in 3.8 kg compost cultures spawned with A. bisporus Horst U1 prior to and during a cultivation with two cycles of mushroom harvesting. The method shows that the initial amount of bioavailable holocellulose per culture, accounting for 130 +/- 22 g, is lower than the total holocellulose consumption by A. bisporus accounting for 182 +/- 15 g. This difference is explained by a 30% increase in bioavailable holocellulose. The increase is caused by the degradation of 95 +/- 3 g of holocellulose-shielding lignin. The results are discussed within the scope of the A. bisporus mushroom yield and lignin degradation by white rot fungi during growth on lignocellulose-containing materials.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2242-2245
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume51
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Keywords

  • scytalidium-thermophilum
  • mushroom compost
  • growth
  • biodegradation
  • lignocellulose
  • fungi
  • acid

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