Levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in familial longevity: the Leiden Longevity Study

R. Noordam, A.J.M. Craen, P. Pedram, A.B. Maier, S.P. Mooijaart, J. van Pelt, E.J.M. Feskens, M.T. Streppel, P.E. Slagboom, R.G. Westendorp, M. Beekman, D. van Heemst

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Low levels of 25(OH) vitamin D are associated with various age-related diseases and mortality, but causality has not been determined. We investigated vitamin D levels in the offspring of nonagenarians who had at least one nonagenarian sibling; these offspring have a lower prevalence of age-related diseases and a higher propensity to reach old age compared with their partners. Methods: We assessed anthropometric characteristics, 25(OH) vitamin D levels, parathyroid hormone levels, dietary vitamin D intake and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with vitamin D levels. We included offspring (n = 1038) of nonagenarians who had at least one nonagenarian sibling, and the offsprings’ partners (n = 461; controls) from the Leiden Longevity Study. We included age, sex, body mass index, month during which blood sampling was performed, dietary and supplemental vitamin D intake, and creatinine levels as possible confounding factors. Results: The offspring had significantly lower levels of vitamin D (64.3 nmol/L) compared with controls (68.4 nmol/L; p = 0.002), independent of possible confounding factors. There was no difference in the levels of parathyroid hormone between groups. Compared with controls, the offspring had a lower frequency of a genetic variant in the CYP2R1 gene (rs2060793) (p = 0.04). The difference in vitamin D levels between offspring and controls persisted over the 2 most prevalent genotypes of this SNP. Interpretation: Compared with controls, the offspring of nonagenarians who had at least one nonagenarian sibling had a reduced frequency of a common variant in the CYP2R1 gene, which predisposes people to high vitamin D levels; they also had lower levels of vitamin D that persisted over the 2 most prevalent genotypes. These results cast doubt on the causal nature of previously reported associations between low levels of vitamin D and age-related diseases and mortality.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E963-E968
JournalCanadian Medical Association Journal
Volume184
Issue number18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Keywords

  • genome-wide association
  • vitamin-d deficiency
  • cardiovascular-disease
  • plasma klotho
  • mortality
  • risk
  • survival
  • adults
  • women
  • age

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in familial longevity: the Leiden Longevity Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this