Lean mass appears to be more strongly associated with bone health than fat mass in urban black South African women

O.F. Sotunde, H.S. Kruger, H.H. Wright, L. Havemann-Nel, Ina Kruger, E. Wentzel-Viljoen, A. Kruger, M. Tieland

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Abstract

Objectives: To examine the association between body composition (fat mass, lean mass and body mass index, BMI) and bone health (bone mineral density, BMD and fracture risk) in urban black South African women. Design: A cross sectional study examining associations between body composition, dietary intake (food frequency questionnaire), habitual physical activity (Activity energy expenditure (AEE) measured using an accelerometer with combined heart rate monitor and physical activity questionnaire) and bone health (BMD using dual-energy X ray absorptiometry, DXA and fracture risk). Setting: Urban community dwellers from Ikageng in the North-West Province of South Africa. Participants: One hundred and eighty nine (189) healthy postmenopausal women aged ≥43 years. Results: Fat mass and lean mass were significantly associated with BMD and fracture risk when adjusted for potential confounders. However, lean mass and not fat mass remained significantly associated with femoral neck BMD (β = 0.49, p

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)628-636
JournalJournal of Nutrition, Health and Aging
Volume19
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Jun 2015

Keywords

  • African women
  • Bone mineral density
  • Fat mass
  • Fracture risk
  • Lean mass

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    Sotunde, O. F., Kruger, H. S., Wright, H. H., Havemann-Nel, L., Kruger, I., Wentzel-Viljoen, E., Kruger, A., & Tieland, M. (2015). Lean mass appears to be more strongly associated with bone health than fat mass in urban black South African women. Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging, 19(6), 628-636. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12603-015-0492-1