Landslide hazard assessment on the ugandan footslopes of mount elgon: The worst is yet to come

Lieven Claessens*, Mary G. Kitutu, Jean Poesen, Jozef A. Deckers

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paperAcademicpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

On the 1st of March 2010 a heavy rainfall event triggered a devastating landslide in the Bududa region on the footslopes of Mount Elgon in eastern Uganda, destroying life and property. Earlier studies published in 2006 and 2007 looked at characteristics and causal factors of older landslides in the area based on a landslide inventory and a detailed digital terrain analysis. In addition, a landslide hazard assessment was conducted with the LAPSUS-LS landslide model identifying susceptible landslide triggering sites and scenarios of landslide erosion and deposition quantities and pathways. This paper revisits the earlier studies and assesses how accurately the recent landslide was predicted. In addition a revised landslide scenario for the near future is elaborated based on the critical rainfall threshold that triggered the recent landslide.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLandslide Science and Practice
Subtitle of host publicationLandslide Inventory and Susceptibility and Hazard Zoning
EditorsC. Margottini, P. Canuti, K. Sassa
PublisherSpringer Science and Business Media Deutschland GmbH
Pages527-531
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)9783642313240
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Feb 2013
Event2nd World Landslide Forum, WLF 2011 - Rome, Italy
Duration: 3 Oct 20119 Oct 2011

Publication series

NameLandslide Science and Practice: Landslide Inventory and Susceptibility and Hazard Zoning
Volume1

Conference

Conference2nd World Landslide Forum, WLF 2011
CountryItaly
CityRome
Period3/10/119/10/11

Keywords

  • Bududa
  • Landslide hazard
  • LAPSUS-LS
  • Uganda

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