Keck is dead, long live Keck? How the court of justice tries to avoid a Sunday Trading Saga 2.0

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In this piece I will unfold how the CJEU, on the one hand, has diminished the importance of the Keck. In this sense, Keck is dead! I will also carefully endorse the recently formulated thesis that after the “Use” cases on the interpretation of the free movement of goods “Keck survives, albeit inelegantly and ignobly”. In this sense, long live Keck! I will show, however, that the Court goes beyond a mere reset to the Sunday trading saga topped up with Keck, but rather advances its approach also at the level of the proportionality test by increasingly regulating the standard of review the Court demands from Member State authorities and national Courts in applying the proportionality principle
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Internal Market and the Future of European Integration
Subtitle of host publicationEssays in Honour of Laurence W. Gormley
EditorsFabian Amtenbrink, Gareth Davies, Dimitry Kochenov, Justin Lindeboom
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages176-187
ISBN (Electronic)9781108565417
ISBN (Print)9781108474412
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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    Purnhagen, K. (2019). Keck is dead, long live Keck? How the court of justice tries to avoid a Sunday Trading Saga 2.0. In F. Amtenbrink, G. Davies, D. Kochenov, & J. Lindeboom (Eds.), The Internal Market and the Future of European Integration: Essays in Honour of Laurence W. Gormley (pp. 176-187). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108565417.013