Isolation of mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium avium from porcine lymph nodes

J. van Ingen, H.J. Wisselink, C.B. van Solt-Smits, M.J. Boeree, D. Soolingen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mycobacterium avium causes lymphadenitis in pigs. This presents an economical burden, as these pigs meat is considered inappropriate for consumption. In humans, lymphadenitis due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) primarily affects children and is caused by a variety of NTM, though M. avium predominates. Mycobacterial culture was undertaken on lymph nodes of 107 slaughter pigs from a single pig farm. A high number of pigs with mycobacterial lymphadenitis were identified by culture. A commercial line probe assay and 16S rDNA gene sequencing were used to assess the frequency of disease due to mycobacteria other than M. avium. Forty-five pigs had mandibular lymph node samples yielding mycobacteria in culture. The majority yielded M. avium (39; 87%) only. One yielded M. avium and Mycobacterium palustre, five yielded only NTM other than M. avium (2 yielded Mycobacterium malmoense, 1 Mycobacterium bohemicum, 1 Mycobacterium heckeshornense and a possibly novel species related to Mycobacterium scrofulaceum, and 1 grew a possibly novel species related to M. palustre). Several NTM species other than M. avium were cultured from porcine lymph nodes. The species distribution shows interesting parallels with human NTM lymphadenitis. Molecular typing and environmental sampling studies are required to identify the sources of these infections.
LanguageEnglish
Pages250-253
JournalVeterinary Microbiology
Volume144
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Mycobacterium avium
Mycobacterium
Nontuberculous Mycobacteria
lymph nodes
Swine
Lymph Nodes
Lymphadenitis
lymphadenitis
swine
Mycobacterium heckeshornense
Mycobacterium bohemicum
Mycobacterium scrofulaceum
Mycobacterium malmoense
Molecular Typing
Sampling Studies
Ribosomal DNA
Meat
slaughter
biogeography
meat

Keywords

  • sp nov.
  • lymphadenitis
  • hominissuis
  • taxonomy
  • proposal
  • complex

Cite this

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title = "Isolation of mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium avium from porcine lymph nodes",
abstract = "Mycobacterium avium causes lymphadenitis in pigs. This presents an economical burden, as these pigs meat is considered inappropriate for consumption. In humans, lymphadenitis due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) primarily affects children and is caused by a variety of NTM, though M. avium predominates. Mycobacterial culture was undertaken on lymph nodes of 107 slaughter pigs from a single pig farm. A high number of pigs with mycobacterial lymphadenitis were identified by culture. A commercial line probe assay and 16S rDNA gene sequencing were used to assess the frequency of disease due to mycobacteria other than M. avium. Forty-five pigs had mandibular lymph node samples yielding mycobacteria in culture. The majority yielded M. avium (39; 87{\%}) only. One yielded M. avium and Mycobacterium palustre, five yielded only NTM other than M. avium (2 yielded Mycobacterium malmoense, 1 Mycobacterium bohemicum, 1 Mycobacterium heckeshornense and a possibly novel species related to Mycobacterium scrofulaceum, and 1 grew a possibly novel species related to M. palustre). Several NTM species other than M. avium were cultured from porcine lymph nodes. The species distribution shows interesting parallels with human NTM lymphadenitis. Molecular typing and environmental sampling studies are required to identify the sources of these infections.",
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Isolation of mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium avium from porcine lymph nodes. / van Ingen, J.; Wisselink, H.J.; van Solt-Smits, C.B.; Boeree, M.J.; Soolingen, D.

In: Veterinary Microbiology, Vol. 144, No. 1-2, 2010, p. 250-253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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T1 - Isolation of mycobacteria other than Mycobacterium avium from porcine lymph nodes

AU - van Ingen, J.

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AU - van Solt-Smits, C.B.

AU - Boeree, M.J.

AU - Soolingen, D.

PY - 2010

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