Is bark pH more important than tree species in determining the composition of nitrophytic or acidophytic lichen floras?

L. Spier, H.F. van Dobben, K.W. van Dort

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To study the pH preference of epiphytic lichens, the bark pH of Fraxinus, Tilia, Quercus and Ulmus trees in an urban environment was measured using a flat surface electrode. The total number of trees was 253. A survey was made of the lichens in a 40 x 40 cm quadrat surrounding the pH measurement point. Our data analysis using multivariate and univariate statistical techniques indicates that the tree species is the most important factor influencing lichen colonisation, and that bark pH alone is of less importance. We hypothesize that the changed pollution climate, with strong decreases in both sulphur dioxide and ammonia concentrations over the past two decades and a concomitant general increase in bark pH, has made epiphytes less sensitive to pH.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3607-3611
JournalEnvironmental Pollution
Volume158
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Keywords

  • epiphytic lichens
  • air-pollution
  • ammonia
  • netherlands
  • communities
  • nh3

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