Inundation as tool for management of Globodera pallida and Verticillium dahliae

W.T. Runia, L.P.G. Molendijk, L. Stevens, M.T. Schilder, J. Postma

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paperAcademic

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Seed potato production is threatened by potato cyst nematodes (PCN). Seed potatoes can only be grown on PCN-free declared potato fields. A seed potato grower chose inundation, flooding his soil, for controlling PCN because resistant cultivars are economically less advantageous and catch crops or granular fumigants gave insufficient results. Inundation is widely used in bulb cultures in The Netherlands to control parasitic nematodes and selectively also pathogenic fungi. Research was performed on the efficiency of inundation against PCN species Globodera pallida and the causal fungal agent of potato wilt Verticillium dahlia (Vd) in a 30 ha field. The effect on soil fertility and texture was also studied. A technical manual for large-scale inundation was written for growers and economic evaluation was performed. Results showed that after 16 weeks of inundation 99.9% of the contents of artificially applied G. pallida cysts was eliminated. Vitality of V. dahlia was reduced with 84%. Incorporation of B. juncea did not increase efficiency. Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) with incorporated B. juncea in the dike surrounding the field, showed a lower efficiency against G. pallida due to incorrect application. Naturally occurring beet cysts lost their vitality after inundation. Incorporation of B. juncea increased soil suppressiveness against Rhizoctonia solani whereas inundation leveled out this effect. By slow release of water after inundation soil texture remained unchanged. Changes in fertilizer content were affected both by the growth and incorporation of B. juncea and by inundation. An increase of sodium and of the electrical conductivity (EC) was noticed. Inundation proved to be highly effective in controlling PCN and Vd and economically feasible for practical application. Long-term effects have to be monitored and effects on other soil quality aspects, both biological, chemical and physical should be taken into account in future research. For some regions in The Netherlands inundation is a new tool for seed potato growers in their Nematode Control Strategy.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 7th IS on Chemical and Non-Chemical Soil and Substrate Disinfestation
EditorsM. Gullino
PublisherISHS
Pages195-201
Volume1044
ISBN (Print)9789462610255
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
EventVIIth IS on Chemical and Non-Chemical Soil and Substrate Disinfestation, Torino, Italy -
Duration: 13 Jul 201417 Jul 2014

Conference

ConferenceVIIth IS on Chemical and Non-Chemical Soil and Substrate Disinfestation, Torino, Italy
Period13/07/1417/07/14

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Globodera pallida
Verticillium dahliae
cyst nematodes
potatoes
seed tubers
Dahlia
growers
soil texture
Netherlands
catch crops
soil
disinfestation
Verticillium
nematode control
Verticillium wilt
fumigants
plant parasitic nematodes
beets
Thanatephorus cucumeris
economic analysis

Cite this

Runia, W. T., Molendijk, L. P. G., Stevens, L., Schilder, M. T., & Postma, J. (2014). Inundation as tool for management of Globodera pallida and Verticillium dahliae. In M. Gullino (Ed.), Proceedings of the 7th IS on Chemical and Non-Chemical Soil and Substrate Disinfestation (Vol. 1044, pp. 195-201). ISHS. https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2014.1044.22
Runia, W.T. ; Molendijk, L.P.G. ; Stevens, L. ; Schilder, M.T. ; Postma, J. / Inundation as tool for management of Globodera pallida and Verticillium dahliae. Proceedings of the 7th IS on Chemical and Non-Chemical Soil and Substrate Disinfestation. editor / M. Gullino. Vol. 1044 ISHS, 2014. pp. 195-201
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title = "Inundation as tool for management of Globodera pallida and Verticillium dahliae",
abstract = "Seed potato production is threatened by potato cyst nematodes (PCN). Seed potatoes can only be grown on PCN-free declared potato fields. A seed potato grower chose inundation, flooding his soil, for controlling PCN because resistant cultivars are economically less advantageous and catch crops or granular fumigants gave insufficient results. Inundation is widely used in bulb cultures in The Netherlands to control parasitic nematodes and selectively also pathogenic fungi. Research was performed on the efficiency of inundation against PCN species Globodera pallida and the causal fungal agent of potato wilt Verticillium dahlia (Vd) in a 30 ha field. The effect on soil fertility and texture was also studied. A technical manual for large-scale inundation was written for growers and economic evaluation was performed. Results showed that after 16 weeks of inundation 99.9{\%} of the contents of artificially applied G. pallida cysts was eliminated. Vitality of V. dahlia was reduced with 84{\%}. Incorporation of B. juncea did not increase efficiency. Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) with incorporated B. juncea in the dike surrounding the field, showed a lower efficiency against G. pallida due to incorrect application. Naturally occurring beet cysts lost their vitality after inundation. Incorporation of B. juncea increased soil suppressiveness against Rhizoctonia solani whereas inundation leveled out this effect. By slow release of water after inundation soil texture remained unchanged. Changes in fertilizer content were affected both by the growth and incorporation of B. juncea and by inundation. An increase of sodium and of the electrical conductivity (EC) was noticed. Inundation proved to be highly effective in controlling PCN and Vd and economically feasible for practical application. Long-term effects have to be monitored and effects on other soil quality aspects, both biological, chemical and physical should be taken into account in future research. For some regions in The Netherlands inundation is a new tool for seed potato growers in their Nematode Control Strategy.",
author = "W.T. Runia and L.P.G. Molendijk and L. Stevens and M.T. Schilder and J. Postma",
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Runia, WT, Molendijk, LPG, Stevens, L, Schilder, MT & Postma, J 2014, Inundation as tool for management of Globodera pallida and Verticillium dahliae. in M Gullino (ed.), Proceedings of the 7th IS on Chemical and Non-Chemical Soil and Substrate Disinfestation. vol. 1044, ISHS, pp. 195-201, VIIth IS on Chemical and Non-Chemical Soil and Substrate Disinfestation, Torino, Italy, 13/07/14. https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2014.1044.22

Inundation as tool for management of Globodera pallida and Verticillium dahliae. / Runia, W.T.; Molendijk, L.P.G.; Stevens, L.; Schilder, M.T.; Postma, J.

Proceedings of the 7th IS on Chemical and Non-Chemical Soil and Substrate Disinfestation. ed. / M. Gullino. Vol. 1044 ISHS, 2014. p. 195-201.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paperAcademic

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T1 - Inundation as tool for management of Globodera pallida and Verticillium dahliae

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AU - Postma, J.

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N2 - Seed potato production is threatened by potato cyst nematodes (PCN). Seed potatoes can only be grown on PCN-free declared potato fields. A seed potato grower chose inundation, flooding his soil, for controlling PCN because resistant cultivars are economically less advantageous and catch crops or granular fumigants gave insufficient results. Inundation is widely used in bulb cultures in The Netherlands to control parasitic nematodes and selectively also pathogenic fungi. Research was performed on the efficiency of inundation against PCN species Globodera pallida and the causal fungal agent of potato wilt Verticillium dahlia (Vd) in a 30 ha field. The effect on soil fertility and texture was also studied. A technical manual for large-scale inundation was written for growers and economic evaluation was performed. Results showed that after 16 weeks of inundation 99.9% of the contents of artificially applied G. pallida cysts was eliminated. Vitality of V. dahlia was reduced with 84%. Incorporation of B. juncea did not increase efficiency. Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) with incorporated B. juncea in the dike surrounding the field, showed a lower efficiency against G. pallida due to incorrect application. Naturally occurring beet cysts lost their vitality after inundation. Incorporation of B. juncea increased soil suppressiveness against Rhizoctonia solani whereas inundation leveled out this effect. By slow release of water after inundation soil texture remained unchanged. Changes in fertilizer content were affected both by the growth and incorporation of B. juncea and by inundation. An increase of sodium and of the electrical conductivity (EC) was noticed. Inundation proved to be highly effective in controlling PCN and Vd and economically feasible for practical application. Long-term effects have to be monitored and effects on other soil quality aspects, both biological, chemical and physical should be taken into account in future research. For some regions in The Netherlands inundation is a new tool for seed potato growers in their Nematode Control Strategy.

AB - Seed potato production is threatened by potato cyst nematodes (PCN). Seed potatoes can only be grown on PCN-free declared potato fields. A seed potato grower chose inundation, flooding his soil, for controlling PCN because resistant cultivars are economically less advantageous and catch crops or granular fumigants gave insufficient results. Inundation is widely used in bulb cultures in The Netherlands to control parasitic nematodes and selectively also pathogenic fungi. Research was performed on the efficiency of inundation against PCN species Globodera pallida and the causal fungal agent of potato wilt Verticillium dahlia (Vd) in a 30 ha field. The effect on soil fertility and texture was also studied. A technical manual for large-scale inundation was written for growers and economic evaluation was performed. Results showed that after 16 weeks of inundation 99.9% of the contents of artificially applied G. pallida cysts was eliminated. Vitality of V. dahlia was reduced with 84%. Incorporation of B. juncea did not increase efficiency. Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) with incorporated B. juncea in the dike surrounding the field, showed a lower efficiency against G. pallida due to incorrect application. Naturally occurring beet cysts lost their vitality after inundation. Incorporation of B. juncea increased soil suppressiveness against Rhizoctonia solani whereas inundation leveled out this effect. By slow release of water after inundation soil texture remained unchanged. Changes in fertilizer content were affected both by the growth and incorporation of B. juncea and by inundation. An increase of sodium and of the electrical conductivity (EC) was noticed. Inundation proved to be highly effective in controlling PCN and Vd and economically feasible for practical application. Long-term effects have to be monitored and effects on other soil quality aspects, both biological, chemical and physical should be taken into account in future research. For some regions in The Netherlands inundation is a new tool for seed potato growers in their Nematode Control Strategy.

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BT - Proceedings of the 7th IS on Chemical and Non-Chemical Soil and Substrate Disinfestation

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Runia WT, Molendijk LPG, Stevens L, Schilder MT, Postma J. Inundation as tool for management of Globodera pallida and Verticillium dahliae. In Gullino M, editor, Proceedings of the 7th IS on Chemical and Non-Chemical Soil and Substrate Disinfestation. Vol. 1044. ISHS. 2014. p. 195-201 https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2014.1044.22