Interfacial layers from the protein HFBII hydrophobin: Dynamic surface tension, dilatational elasticity and relaxation times

N.A. Alexandrov, K.G. Marinova, T.D. Gurkov, K.D. Danov, P.A. Kralchevsky, S.D. Stoyanov, T.B.J. Blijdenstein, L.N. Arnaudov, E.G. Pelan, A. Lips

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The pendant-drop method (with drop-shape analysis) and Langmuir trough are applied to investigate the characteristic relaxation times and elasticity of interfacial layers from the protein HFBII hydrophobin. Such layers undergo a transition from fluid to elastic solid films. The transition is detected as an increase in the error of the fit of the pendant-drop profile by means of the Laplace equation of capillarity. The relaxation of surface tension after interfacial expansion follows an exponential-decay law, which indicates adsorption kinetics under barrier control. The experimental data for the relaxation time suggest that the adsorption rate is determined by the balance of two opposing factors: (i) the barrier to detachment of protein molecules from bulk aggregates and (ii) the attraction of the detached molecules by the adsorption layer due to the hydrophobic surface force. The hydrophobic attraction can explain why a greater surface coverage leads to a faster adsorption. The relaxation of surface tension after interfacial compression follows a different, square-root law. Such behavior can be attributed to surface diffusion of adsorbed protein molecules that are condensing at the periphery of interfacial protein aggregates. The surface dilatational elasticity, E, is determined in experiments on quick expansion or compression of the interfacial protein layers. At lower surface pressures (
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)296-306
JournalJournal of Colloid and Interface Science
Volume376
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Keywords

  • class-ii hydrophobins
  • air-water-interface
  • trichoderma-reesei
  • structural-analysis
  • crystal-structures
  • curved interfaces
  • latex-particles
  • beta-casein
  • adsorption
  • rheology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Interfacial layers from the protein HFBII hydrophobin: Dynamic surface tension, dilatational elasticity and relaxation times'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this