Intercellular transport of epidermis-expressed MADS domain transcription factors and their effect on plant morphology and floral transition

S.L. Urbanus, A.P. Martinelli, Q.D. Dinh, L.C.B. Aizza, M. Dornelas, G.C. Angenent, G.H. Immink

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During the lifetime of an angiosperm plant various important processes such as floral transition, specification of floral organ identity and floral determinacy, are controlled by members of the MADS domain transcription factor family. To investigate the possible non-cell-autonomous function of MADS domain proteins, we expressed GFP-tagged clones of AGAMOUS (AG), APETALA3 (AP3), PISTILLATA (PI) and SEPALLATA3 (SEP3) under the control of the MERISTEMLAYER1 promoter in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Morphological analyses revealed that epidermal overexpression was sufficient for homeotic changes in floral organs, but that it did not result in early flowering or terminal flower phenotypes that are associated with constitutive overexpression of these proteins. Localisations of the tagged proteins in these plants were analysed with confocal laser scanning microscopy in leaf tissue, inflorescence meristems and floral meristems. We demonstrated that only AG is able to move via secondary plasmodesmata from the epidermal cell layer to the subepidermal cell layer in the floral meristem and to a lesser extent in the inflorescence meristem. To study the homeotic effects in more detail, the capacity of trafficking AG to complement the ag mutant phenotype was compared with the capacity of the non-inwards-moving AP3 protein to complement the ap3 mutant phenotype. While epidermal expression of AG gave full complementation, AP3 appeared not to be able to drive all homeotic functions from the epidermis, perhaps reflecting the difference in mobility of these proteins
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)60-72
JournalThe Plant Journal
Volume63
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

plant morphology
Meristem
epidermis (plant)
Epidermis
meristems
Transcription Factors
transcription factors
Inflorescence
Phenotype
phenotype
MADS Domain Proteins
complement
inflorescences
proteins
Plasmodesmata
Angiosperms
mutants
Plant Proteins
plasmodesmata
confocal laser scanning microscopy

Keywords

  • homeotic gene apetala3
  • stem-cell maintenance
  • organ identity
  • arabidopsis-thaliana
  • flower development
  • homeobox genes
  • ectopic expression
  • meristem identity
  • ovule development
  • pound-foolish

Cite this

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title = "Intercellular transport of epidermis-expressed MADS domain transcription factors and their effect on plant morphology and floral transition",
abstract = "During the lifetime of an angiosperm plant various important processes such as floral transition, specification of floral organ identity and floral determinacy, are controlled by members of the MADS domain transcription factor family. To investigate the possible non-cell-autonomous function of MADS domain proteins, we expressed GFP-tagged clones of AGAMOUS (AG), APETALA3 (AP3), PISTILLATA (PI) and SEPALLATA3 (SEP3) under the control of the MERISTEMLAYER1 promoter in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Morphological analyses revealed that epidermal overexpression was sufficient for homeotic changes in floral organs, but that it did not result in early flowering or terminal flower phenotypes that are associated with constitutive overexpression of these proteins. Localisations of the tagged proteins in these plants were analysed with confocal laser scanning microscopy in leaf tissue, inflorescence meristems and floral meristems. We demonstrated that only AG is able to move via secondary plasmodesmata from the epidermal cell layer to the subepidermal cell layer in the floral meristem and to a lesser extent in the inflorescence meristem. To study the homeotic effects in more detail, the capacity of trafficking AG to complement the ag mutant phenotype was compared with the capacity of the non-inwards-moving AP3 protein to complement the ap3 mutant phenotype. While epidermal expression of AG gave full complementation, AP3 appeared not to be able to drive all homeotic functions from the epidermis, perhaps reflecting the difference in mobility of these proteins",
keywords = "homeotic gene apetala3, stem-cell maintenance, organ identity, arabidopsis-thaliana, flower development, homeobox genes, ectopic expression, meristem identity, ovule development, pound-foolish",
author = "S.L. Urbanus and A.P. Martinelli and Q.D. Dinh and L.C.B. Aizza and M. Dornelas and G.C. Angenent and G.H. Immink",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1111/j.1365-313X.2010.04221.x",
language = "English",
volume = "63",
pages = "60--72",
journal = "The Plant Journal",
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Intercellular transport of epidermis-expressed MADS domain transcription factors and their effect on plant morphology and floral transition. / Urbanus, S.L.; Martinelli, A.P.; Dinh, Q.D.; Aizza, L.C.B.; Dornelas, M.; Angenent, G.C.; Immink, G.H.

In: The Plant Journal, Vol. 63, No. 3, 2010, p. 60-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Intercellular transport of epidermis-expressed MADS domain transcription factors and their effect on plant morphology and floral transition

AU - Urbanus, S.L.

AU - Martinelli, A.P.

AU - Dinh, Q.D.

AU - Aizza, L.C.B.

AU - Dornelas, M.

AU - Angenent, G.C.

AU - Immink, G.H.

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - During the lifetime of an angiosperm plant various important processes such as floral transition, specification of floral organ identity and floral determinacy, are controlled by members of the MADS domain transcription factor family. To investigate the possible non-cell-autonomous function of MADS domain proteins, we expressed GFP-tagged clones of AGAMOUS (AG), APETALA3 (AP3), PISTILLATA (PI) and SEPALLATA3 (SEP3) under the control of the MERISTEMLAYER1 promoter in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Morphological analyses revealed that epidermal overexpression was sufficient for homeotic changes in floral organs, but that it did not result in early flowering or terminal flower phenotypes that are associated with constitutive overexpression of these proteins. Localisations of the tagged proteins in these plants were analysed with confocal laser scanning microscopy in leaf tissue, inflorescence meristems and floral meristems. We demonstrated that only AG is able to move via secondary plasmodesmata from the epidermal cell layer to the subepidermal cell layer in the floral meristem and to a lesser extent in the inflorescence meristem. To study the homeotic effects in more detail, the capacity of trafficking AG to complement the ag mutant phenotype was compared with the capacity of the non-inwards-moving AP3 protein to complement the ap3 mutant phenotype. While epidermal expression of AG gave full complementation, AP3 appeared not to be able to drive all homeotic functions from the epidermis, perhaps reflecting the difference in mobility of these proteins

AB - During the lifetime of an angiosperm plant various important processes such as floral transition, specification of floral organ identity and floral determinacy, are controlled by members of the MADS domain transcription factor family. To investigate the possible non-cell-autonomous function of MADS domain proteins, we expressed GFP-tagged clones of AGAMOUS (AG), APETALA3 (AP3), PISTILLATA (PI) and SEPALLATA3 (SEP3) under the control of the MERISTEMLAYER1 promoter in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Morphological analyses revealed that epidermal overexpression was sufficient for homeotic changes in floral organs, but that it did not result in early flowering or terminal flower phenotypes that are associated with constitutive overexpression of these proteins. Localisations of the tagged proteins in these plants were analysed with confocal laser scanning microscopy in leaf tissue, inflorescence meristems and floral meristems. We demonstrated that only AG is able to move via secondary plasmodesmata from the epidermal cell layer to the subepidermal cell layer in the floral meristem and to a lesser extent in the inflorescence meristem. To study the homeotic effects in more detail, the capacity of trafficking AG to complement the ag mutant phenotype was compared with the capacity of the non-inwards-moving AP3 protein to complement the ap3 mutant phenotype. While epidermal expression of AG gave full complementation, AP3 appeared not to be able to drive all homeotic functions from the epidermis, perhaps reflecting the difference in mobility of these proteins

KW - homeotic gene apetala3

KW - stem-cell maintenance

KW - organ identity

KW - arabidopsis-thaliana

KW - flower development

KW - homeobox genes

KW - ectopic expression

KW - meristem identity

KW - ovule development

KW - pound-foolish

U2 - 10.1111/j.1365-313X.2010.04221.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1365-313X.2010.04221.x

M3 - Article

VL - 63

SP - 60

EP - 72

JO - The Plant Journal

JF - The Plant Journal

SN - 0960-7412

IS - 3

ER -