Interaction effects between sender and receiver processes in indirect transmission of Campylobacter jejuni between broilers.

B.A.D. van Bunnik, T.H.J. Hagenaars, N.M. Bolder, G. Nodelijk, M.C.M. de Jong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Infectious diseases in plants, animals and humans are often transmitted indirectly between hosts (or between groups of hosts), i.e. via some route through the environment instead of via direct contacts between these hosts. Here we study indirect transmission experimentally, using transmission of Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) between spatially separated broilers as a model system. We distinguish three stages in the process of indirect transmission; (1) an infectious "sender" excretes the agent, after which (2) the agent is transported via some route to a susceptible "receiver", and subsequently (3) the receiver becomes colonised by the agent. The role of the sender and receiver side (stage 1 and stage 3) was studied here by using acidification of the drinking water as a modulation mechanism. Results: In the experiment one control group and three treatment groups were monitored for the presence of C. jejuni by taking daily cloacal swabs. The three treatments consisted of acidification of the drinking water of the inoculated animals (the senders), acidification of the drinking water of the susceptible animals (the receivers) or acidification of the drinking water of both inoculated and susceptible animals. In the control group 12 animals got colonised out of a possible 40, in each treatment groups 3 animals out of a possible 40 were found colonised with C. jejuni. Conclusions: The results of the experiments show a significant decrease in transmission rate (beta) between the control groups and treatment groups (p <0.01 for all groups) but not between different treatments; there is a significant negative interaction effect when both the sender and the receiver group receive acidified drinking water (p = 0.01). This negative interaction effect could be due to selection of bacteria already at the sender side thereby diminishing the effect of acidification at the receiver side.
LanguageEnglish
Article number123
JournalBMC Veterinary Research
Volume8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Campylobacter jejuni
Drinking Water
acidification
broiler chickens
drinking water
animals
Control Groups
direct contact
infectious diseases
Communicable Diseases
Bacteria
bacteria

Keywords

  • swine-fever virus
  • drinking-water
  • netherlands
  • epidemic
  • quantification
  • salmonella
  • resistance
  • bacteria
  • evaluate
  • design

Cite this

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title = "Interaction effects between sender and receiver processes in indirect transmission of Campylobacter jejuni between broilers.",
abstract = "Background: Infectious diseases in plants, animals and humans are often transmitted indirectly between hosts (or between groups of hosts), i.e. via some route through the environment instead of via direct contacts between these hosts. Here we study indirect transmission experimentally, using transmission of Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) between spatially separated broilers as a model system. We distinguish three stages in the process of indirect transmission; (1) an infectious {"}sender{"} excretes the agent, after which (2) the agent is transported via some route to a susceptible {"}receiver{"}, and subsequently (3) the receiver becomes colonised by the agent. The role of the sender and receiver side (stage 1 and stage 3) was studied here by using acidification of the drinking water as a modulation mechanism. Results: In the experiment one control group and three treatment groups were monitored for the presence of C. jejuni by taking daily cloacal swabs. The three treatments consisted of acidification of the drinking water of the inoculated animals (the senders), acidification of the drinking water of the susceptible animals (the receivers) or acidification of the drinking water of both inoculated and susceptible animals. In the control group 12 animals got colonised out of a possible 40, in each treatment groups 3 animals out of a possible 40 were found colonised with C. jejuni. Conclusions: The results of the experiments show a significant decrease in transmission rate (beta) between the control groups and treatment groups (p <0.01 for all groups) but not between different treatments; there is a significant negative interaction effect when both the sender and the receiver group receive acidified drinking water (p = 0.01). This negative interaction effect could be due to selection of bacteria already at the sender side thereby diminishing the effect of acidification at the receiver side.",
keywords = "swine-fever virus, drinking-water, netherlands, epidemic, quantification, salmonella, resistance, bacteria, evaluate, design",
author = "{van Bunnik}, B.A.D. and T.H.J. Hagenaars and N.M. Bolder and G. Nodelijk and {de Jong}, M.C.M.",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1186/1746-6148-8-123",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "BMC Veterinary Research",
issn = "1746-6148",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",

}

Interaction effects between sender and receiver processes in indirect transmission of Campylobacter jejuni between broilers. / van Bunnik, B.A.D.; Hagenaars, T.H.J.; Bolder, N.M.; Nodelijk, G.; de Jong, M.C.M.

In: BMC Veterinary Research, Vol. 8, 123, 2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Interaction effects between sender and receiver processes in indirect transmission of Campylobacter jejuni between broilers.

AU - van Bunnik, B.A.D.

AU - Hagenaars, T.H.J.

AU - Bolder, N.M.

AU - Nodelijk, G.

AU - de Jong, M.C.M.

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Background: Infectious diseases in plants, animals and humans are often transmitted indirectly between hosts (or between groups of hosts), i.e. via some route through the environment instead of via direct contacts between these hosts. Here we study indirect transmission experimentally, using transmission of Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) between spatially separated broilers as a model system. We distinguish three stages in the process of indirect transmission; (1) an infectious "sender" excretes the agent, after which (2) the agent is transported via some route to a susceptible "receiver", and subsequently (3) the receiver becomes colonised by the agent. The role of the sender and receiver side (stage 1 and stage 3) was studied here by using acidification of the drinking water as a modulation mechanism. Results: In the experiment one control group and three treatment groups were monitored for the presence of C. jejuni by taking daily cloacal swabs. The three treatments consisted of acidification of the drinking water of the inoculated animals (the senders), acidification of the drinking water of the susceptible animals (the receivers) or acidification of the drinking water of both inoculated and susceptible animals. In the control group 12 animals got colonised out of a possible 40, in each treatment groups 3 animals out of a possible 40 were found colonised with C. jejuni. Conclusions: The results of the experiments show a significant decrease in transmission rate (beta) between the control groups and treatment groups (p <0.01 for all groups) but not between different treatments; there is a significant negative interaction effect when both the sender and the receiver group receive acidified drinking water (p = 0.01). This negative interaction effect could be due to selection of bacteria already at the sender side thereby diminishing the effect of acidification at the receiver side.

AB - Background: Infectious diseases in plants, animals and humans are often transmitted indirectly between hosts (or between groups of hosts), i.e. via some route through the environment instead of via direct contacts between these hosts. Here we study indirect transmission experimentally, using transmission of Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) between spatially separated broilers as a model system. We distinguish three stages in the process of indirect transmission; (1) an infectious "sender" excretes the agent, after which (2) the agent is transported via some route to a susceptible "receiver", and subsequently (3) the receiver becomes colonised by the agent. The role of the sender and receiver side (stage 1 and stage 3) was studied here by using acidification of the drinking water as a modulation mechanism. Results: In the experiment one control group and three treatment groups were monitored for the presence of C. jejuni by taking daily cloacal swabs. The three treatments consisted of acidification of the drinking water of the inoculated animals (the senders), acidification of the drinking water of the susceptible animals (the receivers) or acidification of the drinking water of both inoculated and susceptible animals. In the control group 12 animals got colonised out of a possible 40, in each treatment groups 3 animals out of a possible 40 were found colonised with C. jejuni. Conclusions: The results of the experiments show a significant decrease in transmission rate (beta) between the control groups and treatment groups (p <0.01 for all groups) but not between different treatments; there is a significant negative interaction effect when both the sender and the receiver group receive acidified drinking water (p = 0.01). This negative interaction effect could be due to selection of bacteria already at the sender side thereby diminishing the effect of acidification at the receiver side.

KW - swine-fever virus

KW - drinking-water

KW - netherlands

KW - epidemic

KW - quantification

KW - salmonella

KW - resistance

KW - bacteria

KW - evaluate

KW - design

U2 - 10.1186/1746-6148-8-123

DO - 10.1186/1746-6148-8-123

M3 - Article

VL - 8

JO - BMC Veterinary Research

T2 - BMC Veterinary Research

JF - BMC Veterinary Research

SN - 1746-6148

M1 - 123

ER -