Integration of first and second generation biofuels: Fermentative hydrogen production from wheat grain and straw

I.A. Panagiotopoulos, R.R.C. Bakker, G.J. de Vrije, P.A.M. Claassen, E.G. Koukios

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Integrating of lignocellulose-based and starch-rich biomass-based hydrogen production was investigated by mixing wheat straw hydrolysate with a wheat grain hydrolysate for improved fermentation. Enzymatic pretreatment and hydrolysis of wheat grains led to a hydrolysate with a sugar concentration of 93.4 g/L, while dilute-acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw led to a hydrolysate with sugar concentration 23.0 g/L. Wheat grain hydrolysate was not suitable for hydrogen production by the extreme thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus at glucose concentrations of 10 g/L or higher, and wheat straw hydrolysate showed good fermentability at total sugar concentrations of up to 10 g/L. The mixed hydrolysates showed good fermentability at the highest tested sugar concentration of 20 g/L, with a hydrogen production of 82–97% of that of the control with pure sugars. Mixing wheat grain hydrolysate with wheat straw hydrolysate would be beneficial for fermentative hydrogen production in a biorefinery.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)345-350
JournalBioresource Technology
Volume128
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Keywords

  • thermophiles caldicellulosiruptor-saccharolyticus
  • dilute-acid pretreatment
  • thermotoga-neapolitana
  • extreme thermophiles
  • bioethanol production
  • biomass
  • inhibition
  • conversion
  • ethanol
  • pulp

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