Intake of fatty fish and n-3 fatty acids intake in relation to cognitive performance and 6 year cognitive change in ageing men: the Veterans Affairs Normative Aging Study

O. van de Rest, A. Spiro, E. Krall Kaye, J.M. Geleijnse, C.P.G.M. de Groot, K.L. Tucker

Research output: Contribution to journalAbstractAcademic

Abstract

Background: High intake of fish and marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) may protect against age-related cognitive decline. However, results are inconsistent and limited data exist regarding changes in multiple cognitive functions over a longer period of time. Objective: To assess the association between fatty fish as well as marine n-3 PUFA (EPA-DHA) intake with cognitive performance and cognitive change over 6 years in 1025 elderly men. Design: Participants were from the US Veterans Affairs Normative Aging Study (NAS). Cognitive function was assessed with a battery of cognitive tests focusing on the factors memory/language, speed and visuospatial/attention. Dietary intakes were assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. General linear models were used to assess cross-sectional associations and mixed models were used to assess the associations over time. Models were adjusted for age, education (model 1) and also for BMI, smoking, diabetes, and intake of alcohol, saturated fat, vitamin C and vitamin E (model 2). Results: Mean age of the participating men was 68 years at baseline. Median fish consumption ranged from 0.7 to 4.2 portions per week over the quartiles. Cross-sectional analyses showed no association between fatty fish or EPA-DHA intake and cognitive performance. Also over 6 years of follow-up we did not observe any significant associations between fatty fish or EPA-DHA intake and cognitive change. Conclusions: In this population of elderly men, higher intake of fatty fish or EPA-DHA was neither associated with cognitive performance nor with 6-year cognitive change
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S21 (P49)-S21
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume63
Issue numberS3
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Veterans
Fishes
Cognition
United States Department of Veterans Affairs
Vitamin E
Ascorbic Acid
Linear Models
Language
Cross-Sectional Studies
Smoking
Fats
Alcohols
Education
Food
Population

Cite this

@article{a14df55cc3c343b59ca16fcc48a50978,
title = "Intake of fatty fish and n-3 fatty acids intake in relation to cognitive performance and 6 year cognitive change in ageing men: the Veterans Affairs Normative Aging Study",
abstract = "Background: High intake of fish and marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) may protect against age-related cognitive decline. However, results are inconsistent and limited data exist regarding changes in multiple cognitive functions over a longer period of time. Objective: To assess the association between fatty fish as well as marine n-3 PUFA (EPA-DHA) intake with cognitive performance and cognitive change over 6 years in 1025 elderly men. Design: Participants were from the US Veterans Affairs Normative Aging Study (NAS). Cognitive function was assessed with a battery of cognitive tests focusing on the factors memory/language, speed and visuospatial/attention. Dietary intakes were assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. General linear models were used to assess cross-sectional associations and mixed models were used to assess the associations over time. Models were adjusted for age, education (model 1) and also for BMI, smoking, diabetes, and intake of alcohol, saturated fat, vitamin C and vitamin E (model 2). Results: Mean age of the participating men was 68 years at baseline. Median fish consumption ranged from 0.7 to 4.2 portions per week over the quartiles. Cross-sectional analyses showed no association between fatty fish or EPA-DHA intake and cognitive performance. Also over 6 years of follow-up we did not observe any significant associations between fatty fish or EPA-DHA intake and cognitive change. Conclusions: In this population of elderly men, higher intake of fatty fish or EPA-DHA was neither associated with cognitive performance nor with 6-year cognitive change",
author = "{van de Rest}, O. and A. Spiro and {Krall Kaye}, E. and J.M. Geleijnse and {de Groot}, C.P.G.M. and K.L. Tucker",
year = "2009",
language = "English",
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pages = "S21 (P49)--S21",
journal = "European Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0954-3007",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Intake of fatty fish and n-3 fatty acids intake in relation to cognitive performance and 6 year cognitive change in ageing men: the Veterans Affairs Normative Aging Study

AU - van de Rest, O.

AU - Spiro, A.

AU - Krall Kaye, E.

AU - Geleijnse, J.M.

AU - de Groot, C.P.G.M.

AU - Tucker, K.L.

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - Background: High intake of fish and marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) may protect against age-related cognitive decline. However, results are inconsistent and limited data exist regarding changes in multiple cognitive functions over a longer period of time. Objective: To assess the association between fatty fish as well as marine n-3 PUFA (EPA-DHA) intake with cognitive performance and cognitive change over 6 years in 1025 elderly men. Design: Participants were from the US Veterans Affairs Normative Aging Study (NAS). Cognitive function was assessed with a battery of cognitive tests focusing on the factors memory/language, speed and visuospatial/attention. Dietary intakes were assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. General linear models were used to assess cross-sectional associations and mixed models were used to assess the associations over time. Models were adjusted for age, education (model 1) and also for BMI, smoking, diabetes, and intake of alcohol, saturated fat, vitamin C and vitamin E (model 2). Results: Mean age of the participating men was 68 years at baseline. Median fish consumption ranged from 0.7 to 4.2 portions per week over the quartiles. Cross-sectional analyses showed no association between fatty fish or EPA-DHA intake and cognitive performance. Also over 6 years of follow-up we did not observe any significant associations between fatty fish or EPA-DHA intake and cognitive change. Conclusions: In this population of elderly men, higher intake of fatty fish or EPA-DHA was neither associated with cognitive performance nor with 6-year cognitive change

AB - Background: High intake of fish and marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) may protect against age-related cognitive decline. However, results are inconsistent and limited data exist regarding changes in multiple cognitive functions over a longer period of time. Objective: To assess the association between fatty fish as well as marine n-3 PUFA (EPA-DHA) intake with cognitive performance and cognitive change over 6 years in 1025 elderly men. Design: Participants were from the US Veterans Affairs Normative Aging Study (NAS). Cognitive function was assessed with a battery of cognitive tests focusing on the factors memory/language, speed and visuospatial/attention. Dietary intakes were assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. General linear models were used to assess cross-sectional associations and mixed models were used to assess the associations over time. Models were adjusted for age, education (model 1) and also for BMI, smoking, diabetes, and intake of alcohol, saturated fat, vitamin C and vitamin E (model 2). Results: Mean age of the participating men was 68 years at baseline. Median fish consumption ranged from 0.7 to 4.2 portions per week over the quartiles. Cross-sectional analyses showed no association between fatty fish or EPA-DHA intake and cognitive performance. Also over 6 years of follow-up we did not observe any significant associations between fatty fish or EPA-DHA intake and cognitive change. Conclusions: In this population of elderly men, higher intake of fatty fish or EPA-DHA was neither associated with cognitive performance nor with 6-year cognitive change

M3 - Abstract

VL - 63

SP - S21 (P49)-S21

JO - European Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - European Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0954-3007

IS - S3

ER -