Inhibition of lipoxygenase affects induction of both direct and indirect plant defences against herbivorous insects

M. Bruinsma, S. Broekhoven, E.H. Poelman, M.A. Posthumus, M.J. Müller, J.J.A. van Loon, M. Dicke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Herbivore-induced plant defences influence the behaviour of insects associated with the plant. For biting–chewing herbivores the octadecanoid signal-transduction pathway has been suggested to play a key role in induced plant defence. To test this hypothesis in our plant—herbivore—parasitoid tritrophic system, we used phenidone, an inhibitor of the enzyme lipoxygenase (LOX), that catalyses the initial step in the octadecanoid pathway. Phenidone treatment of Brussels sprouts plants reduced the accumulation of internal signalling compounds in the octadecanoid pathway downstream of the step catalysed by LOX, i.e. 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) and jasmonic acid. The attraction of Cotesia glomerata parasitoids to host-infested plants was significantly reduced by phenidone treatment. The three herbivores investigated, i.e. the specialists Plutella xylostella, Pieris brassicae and Pieris rapae, showed different oviposition preferences for intact and infested plants, and for two species their preference for either intact or infested plants was shown to be LOX dependent. Our results show that phenidone inhibits the LOX-dependent defence response of the plant and that this inhibition can influence the behaviour of members of the associated insect community.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)393-404
JournalOecologia
Volume162
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Keywords

  • volatile biosynthesis
  • oviposition preference
  • differential induction
  • tritrophic interaction
  • arabidopsis-thaliana
  • nicotiana-attenuata
  • parasitic wasps
  • specialist
  • responses
  • arthropods

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